fugue

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Related to Fuge: Foge, Fugue state

fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

(fūg) a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but their behavior is not directed by their complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue , psychogenic fugue a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode of sudden, unexpected travel away from home or business, with amnesia for the past and partial to total confusion about identity or assumption of a new identity.

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.

fugue

[fyo̅o̅g]
Etymology: L, fuga, running away
a state of dissociative reaction characterized by amnesia and physical flight from an intolerable situation. During the episode the person appears normal and seems consciously aware of what may be very complex activities and behavior, but afterward he or she has no recollection of the actions or behavior. The condition may last for only a few days or weeks, or it may continue for several years, during which the person wanders away from the customary environment, enters a new occupation, and undertakes an entirely different way of life. The syndrome appears to be caused by an inability to cope with a severe conflict or with a chronically stressful life situation. A form of fugue also occurs briefly after an epileptic seizure. See also ambulatory automatism, automatism, dissociative disorder.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.

fugue (fyōōg),

n dissociative response in which an individual experiences amnesia and physically flees specific circumstances. Person may exhibit normal reactions to the situation but will have no recollection of the event or his response.
References in periodicals archive ?
She said Fuge, of previous good character, was recovering from cancer, having gone into remission in 2015, and also suffered from asthma.
The Grosse Fuge, which begins by exploring several different versions of the same melodic material, is a case in point.
Strings Attached concludes with the Artemis Quartet's 2001 performance of Beethoven's Gro[beta]e Fuge, which confirms the value of such a detailed approach by presenting a nuanced performance of this dense work that reveals not.
mit der Frage, ob man eine Bachsche Fuge verbessern konne).
Richard Fuge, 54, of Dumbarton, was speaking after lorry driver Colin Kane was cleared by a not proven verdict of causing the death of his daughter Alice-Anne.
Grant, who opened his shoulders towards the tail end of the innings, shared a second wicket stand of 49 with Adam Fuge (16) and put on 57 runs for the fifth wicket with Sam Lyle (24).
Though program notes suggested Hans Van Manen's Grosse Fuge as equalizing gender differences, Houston's dominant men overpowered the cast's women.
Fifty works have been chosen, representing such forms as chant, organum, masses, motets, chanson, canzonas, lute pieces, ricercari and keyboard works from an anonymous early-seventeenth-century canzona to a fugue from Bach's Die Kunst der Fuge.
The evening consisted of Symphony in Three Movements, Gross Fuge and Elite Syncopations.
Gear oil,Brake oil &coolant change,Brake Pad & Brake Liner,AC Compressor repairing, AC Servicing & AC filter, Spark Plug & Fuge Box Reel Replace.