fugue

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Related to Fugato: fugal

fugue

 [fūg]
a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but his behavior is not directed by his complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue (psychogenic fugue) a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode in which an individual forgets his past, assumes a partial or complete new identity, and travels away from home or work, in some cases taking up a new name, occupation, and lifestyle. During the fugue, patients are unaware that they have forgotten anything and seem to other people to be behaving normally; following recovery, they recall nothing that happened during the fugue. The disorder is usually related to emotional conflicts due to some traumatic, stressful, or overwhelming event, remits spontaneously, and rarely recurs.

fugue

(fyūg),
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, the person has amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills, and procedural memory, are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

(fūg) a pathological state of altered consciousness in which an individual may act and wander around as though conscious but their behavior is not directed by their complete normal personality and is not remembered after the fugue ends.
dissociative fugue , psychogenic fugue a dissociative disorder characterized by an episode of sudden, unexpected travel away from home or business, with amnesia for the past and partial to total confusion about identity or assumption of a new identity.

fugue

(fyo͞og)
n.
Psychiatry A dissociative state, usually caused by trauma, marked by sudden travel or wandering away from home and an inability to remember one's past.

fu′gal (fyo͞o′gəl) adj.
fu′gal·ly adv.
fugue v.
fugu′ist (fyo͞o′gĭst) n.

fugue

[fyo̅o̅g]
Etymology: L, fuga, running away
a state of dissociative reaction characterized by amnesia and physical flight from an intolerable situation. During the episode the person appears normal and seems consciously aware of what may be very complex activities and behavior, but afterward he or she has no recollection of the actions or behavior. The condition may last for only a few days or weeks, or it may continue for several years, during which the person wanders away from the customary environment, enters a new occupation, and undertakes an entirely different way of life. The syndrome appears to be caused by an inability to cope with a severe conflict or with a chronically stressful life situation. A form of fugue also occurs briefly after an epileptic seizure. See also ambulatory automatism, automatism, dissociative disorder.
Neurology A state in which the patient denies memory of activities for a period of hours to weeks; to external appearances, these activities were either completely normal or the patient disappeared and travelled extensively; most are functional; short fugues rarely occur in temporal lobe epilepsy
Psychiatry A state of personality dissociation characterised by amnesia and possibly physical flight from the customary environment or field of conflict

fugue

(fyūg)
A condition in which a person suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one, often in a different city; afterward, alleges amnesia for events occurring during the fugue period, although earlier events are remembered and habits and skills are usually unaffected.
[Fr. fr. L. fuga, flight]

fugue

A rare psychological reaction to an intolerable situation in which the affected person wanders away from the old environment, apparently in a state of AMNESIA, and takes on a new identity, occupation and life. The loss of memory is selective and does not preclude use of the previous education. If there is recovery from the fugue, amnesia for the period of the fugue occurs.

Fugue

A dissociative experience during which a person travels away from home, has amnesia for their past, and may be confused about their identity but otherwise appear normal.

fugue (fyōōg),

n dissociative response in which an individual experiences amnesia and physically flees specific circumstances. Person may exhibit normal reactions to the situation but will have no recollection of the event or his response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gauti rezultatai rodo, kad ceolito uzpildai gali buti naudojami amonio jonams is dumblo fugato salinti, o salinimo efektyvumas, naudojant 2,0-2,5 mm frakcijos ceolita, siekia 76 %.
The early fugato section almost fell apart, and yet there were some brilliant tutti moments.
To witness the special, mutually respectful relationship between this near-octogenarian and these willing, accomplished teenagers was something very moving, and it was particularly gratifying to observe how Davis got the youngsters to listen to each other, as in the exposed fugato of the finale.
109-14), she later admits that the fugato in the Fourth's first movement "deliberately goe[s] far beyond .
That suite here begins disappointingly glutinously, though already every line can be identified as clearly defined, with exuberant oboe flourishes, and by the time the swift fugato kicks in we are away with an exhilarating busy-ness and sense of space where the trumpets blaze.
For all conductor Michael Lloyd's judicious building through dynamic development, this remained an uneasy reading, cellos thin in their upper reaches and strings generally struggling in the hectic fugato.
The developmental fugato in the finale is perhaps more strongly linked to works of 1801-2, such as the finale of the Piano Sonata op.
The classical (or Baroque) cathedral anthem was on the scale of a cantata, with long solos and ensembles often introduced by recitatives, antiphonal passages for double choir, and choruses of varying form and texture, including fugue or fugato.
This capstone to an unjustly neglected work also includes a grand apotheosis of the slow movement's theme as well as the almost inevitable Taneyev fugato, carried out with such mastery that manipulations of the opening theme (heard in inversion, augmentation, and the like) do not seem digressive, but actually enhance the climax.
727: "Igitur Balaam divinculis acceptis, cum solerent daemones ad se venire, fugatos quidem daemones videt, sed adesse Deum; et ideo dicit interrogare se Deum, quia consuetos sibi parare nusquam daemones videt.