frozen

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frozen

/fro·zen/ (fro´zen)
1. turned into, covered by, or surrounded by ice.
2. very cold.
3. stiff or immobile, or rendered immobile.

frozen

EBM
A term used in the context of a clinical trial for the status of a database, file or element that is presumed to be in its final state, pending "lock", and at the point at which further editing is prevented without "unfreezing".
Freezing and unfreezing are usually formalised in audit trails and differ from "locking" and "unlocking" only in the level of permission required to unlock or unfreeze.

frozen

said of material kept at less than 0°C. Biological materials are frozen solid because of their high water content.

frozen embryo
see embryo transfer.
frozen meat
meat preserved at low temperatures in a freezer.
frozen section
a specimen of tissue that has been quick-frozen, cut by microtome, and stained immediately for rapid diagnosis of possible malignant lesions. A specimen processed in this manner is not satisfactory for detailed study of the cells, but it is valuable because it is quick and gives the surgeon immediate information regarding the malignancy of a piece of tissue.
frozen semen
see semen.
References in periodicals archive ?
33) Frozenness is always, in Szirtes's poetry, arrested motion, the abrupt, often violent, curtailing of dynamism into stasis, something always potentially on the verge of heat and movement, the coldness of the past entering into the warm present.
The death of the other is, like the other's existence in the shared historical and geographical spaces of "Backwaters: Norfolk Fields," an exotic event, introducing into "Meeting Austerlitz" the absent presence of the exotic other as dead, as "distant or cold" in its frozenness, its strange difference from the otherness of the alienating social reality of the poem.
No, it has to be unleashed, or better still, it has to be shattered and shaken out of the frozenness and stabilities of our lives.
Mind: `affinity', says Haraway, `not identity', not that slowed down frozenness, but rather these warm, mobile, tactile, sensitive wanderings, say these `weaving' to-and-froes between the One and the Other (quotations from 149, 155, 170).
The frozenness of pseudoclefts: towards an inequality-based syntax.
In general, it needs to be noted that primary verb phrases, though certainly idiomatic to some degree, are far more free and compositional than the prototypical phraseological idioms, which is proved by their greater syntactic freedom, greater compositionality and lesser internal frozenness.
Thus, we might say that an idiomatic phrase is a complex construction, whose total meaning is non-compositional to some degree (the constituent parts contribute varying amount of meaning to the sense of the whole expression), has a varying degree of frozenness as regards insertion, deletion or substitution of its elements and is restricted to a certain degree with regards to the movements the literal phrases of the same structure allow.
I regard fixedness as one subtype of idioiiiatic FROZENNESS (cf Fraser, 1970).