fritillary

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Related to Fritillaria: Fritillaria imperialis, Fritillaria meleagris

fritillary

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Fritillaria imperialis lutea has vibrant sulphur yellow blooms, with the same fine appearance, and is more vigorous than the orange form.
Fritillaria michailovskyii is an easy bulb to flower but is one of those plants that you either love or hate.
The yellow one is the Crown Imperial - Fritillaria imperialis 'Maxima Lutea'.
Look out for some of the more unusual bulbs that might suite particular conditions in your garden - fritillaria meleagris and leucojums like it wet, anemone blanda likes it partially shaded and camassias do well in long grass.
Fritillaria has scattered pink blooms on a white background, and is in French percale, pounds 59 a metre or silk taffetta pounds 75 a metre.
Bulbs fit in well, too - snake's head fritillaries ( Fritillaria meleagris ), the wild daffodil or Lent lily (Narcissus pseudonarcissus), English bluebells and native orchids.
To order by debit/credit card call 0844 448 2451 quoting SMG17975 or send a cheque made payable to MGN SMG17975 to Fritillaria Offer (SMG17975), PO Box 64, South West District Office, Manchester, M16 9HY or visit www.
Firm favourites include hyacinths, tulips, daffodils and crocus, while there is also an abundanc of new varieties of iris, fritillaria and camassia.
There are two new introductions to the Fritillaria range.
We have potted up a few allium and fritillaria bulbs, caned and tied up some heliotropes that we would like to grow into large standard plants for use next summer, and, between showers one day, managed to nip out and lift the dahlias and store them before the frosts come.
Si an Fmcvt The other bulb is Fritillaria persica, much more subtle - I love the contrast between the very dark flowers and the glaucous lanceshaped leaves.
PLANT IN THE GARDEN: Far and away the most spectacular, the crown imperial, Fritillaria imperialis, often graces the front gardens of small cottages where it may have grown for scores of years.