Friedman curve


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par·to·gram

(par'tō-gram),
Graph of labor parameters of time and dilation with alert and action lines to prompt intervention if the curve deviates from expected.
[L. partus, childbirth, + -gram]

Friedman curve

[frēd′mən]
Etymology: Emanuel A. Friedman, American obstetrician, b. 1926
a graph depicting the progress of labor, prepared by labor attendants to facilitate detection of dysfunctional labor. Observations of cervical dilation and fetal descent are plotted on the vertical axis against time on the horizontal axis. The labor curve is divided into latent and active phases, with the latter subdivided into latent, acceleration, maximum slope, and deceleration.

par·to·gram

(pahr'tō-gram)
Graph of labor parameters of time and dilation with alert and action lines to prompt intervention if the curve deviates from expected.
Synonym(s): Friedman curve, labor curve.
[L. partus, childbirth, + -gram]

Friedman,

Emanuel A., U.S. obstetrician, 1926–.
Friedman curve - a graph on which hours of labor are plotted against cervical dilation in centimeters.
References in periodicals archive ?
More recently, other data show that "the Friedman curve was really codified by the way we examined women every 2 hours.
Their results demonstrate marked differences to the Friedman curve.
When a patient reaches 8 cm of dilatation, remember the deceleration phase of the Friedman curve, and avoid starting Pitocin as a reaction to this phase.