freudian

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Related to Freudians: Freudian slip, Sigmund Freud

freudian

 [froi´de-an]
1. pertaining to Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis or his psychological theories and method of psychotherapy (psychoanalytic theory and technique).
2. an adherent or user of freudian theory or methods.

freud·i·an

(froyd'ē-ăn),
Relating to or described by the Viennese psychiatrist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939).

freudian

/freud·i·an/ (froi´de-in)
1. pertaining to Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis, or his psychological theories and method of psychotherapy (psychoanalytic theory and technique).
2. an adherent or user of freudian theory or methods.

Freudian

(froi′dē-ən)
adj.
Relating to or being in accordance with the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud.
n.
A person who accepts the basic tenets of the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud, especially a psychiatrist or psychologist who applies Freudian theory and method in conducting psychotherapy.

Freud′i·an·ism n.

freudian

[froi′dē·ən]
Etymology: Sigmund Freud
1 adj, pertaining to Sigmund Freud; his theories and doctrines, which stress the formative years of childhood as the basis for later psychoneurotic disorders, primarily through the unconscious repression of instinctual drives and sexual desires; and his system of psychoanalysis, based on free association and dream analysis, for treating such disturbances.
2 adj, pertaining to anything that is easily interpreted according to the theories of Freud or in psychoanalytic terms.
3 adj, pertaining to the school of psychiatry based on Freud's teachings.
4 n, one who adheres to Freud's school of psychiatry. See also psychoanalysis.

freud·i·an

(froyd'ē-ăn)
Relating to or described by the Viennese psychiatrist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939).

Freud,

Sigmund, Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist, 1856-1939, founder of psychoanalysis.
Freud theory - a comprehensive theory of how personality is formed and develops in normal and emotionally disturbed individuals.
freudian - relating to or described by Freud.
freudian fixation
freudian psychoanalysis - the theory and practice of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy as developed by Freud.
freudian slip - a mistake in speech or deed which presumably suggests some underlying motive, often sexual or aggressive in nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fromm's reputation among orthodox Freudians declined even more dramatically in the 1950s when he published numerous popular articles and best-selling books attacking central elements of orthodox Freudian theory (Fromm, 1950; Fromm, 1951; Fromm, 1959; McLaughlin, 1998).
1983 The Repression of Psychoanalysis: Otto Fenichel and the Political Freudians.
The break between Fromm and the Frankfurt School is explained with reference to both ideational (different interpretations of Freudian theory and the nature of left ideology) as well as institutional factors (competition over resources within the Frankfurt School and the professionalization of psychoanalysis).
Horkheimer had initially been interested in merging Marxist politics with the psychological insights of the Freudian tradition.
The fundamental source of Fromm's departure from the Frankfurt School for Social Research was conflict between Adorno and Fromm over both resources and Freudian theory.
When Fromm first developed his psychological thought within the Frankfurt School, he subscribed to an orthodox Freudian libido theory that emphasized the centrality of instincts.
The beginning of open conflict, however, can be dated to Fromm's essay "The Social Determination of Psychoanalytic Therapy," an early version of his later criticisms of orthodox Freudian theory and therapy published in the critical theory's journal in 1935 (Wiggershaus, 1994).
For Adorno, Fromm's revision of Freudian theory inevitably led away from a truly radical critique of modern society -- substituting soft-hearted therapy for rigorous analysis.
Marcuse's initial attack on Fromm was the major theme of a larger essay on "neo-Freudian" critiques of orthodox Freudian theory (Marcuse, 1955b).
The central theme of the revisionists, according to Marcuse, is that the present environment caused more conflicts than allowed for in the orthodox Freudian biological model focused on sexual instincts and the first five or six years of life.
While Marcuse's essay was framed explicitly around the issue of Freudian theory, there was, as with Adorno's earlier critique, a Marxist subtext to the polemic.
The first step towards this radical project must be an internal battle within the left, a defence of orthodox Freudian ideas against revision.