French paradox


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A term referring to the decreased incidence of coronary heart disease in the French, which is attributed to increased alcohol consumption, as well as a more relaxed lifestyle and lack of snacking between meals

French paradox

An informal term for the unexplained fact that, in spite of a national diet characterized by a high fat and cholesterol intake, the French enjoy almost the lowest incidence of coronary heart disease in Europe. Possible explanations include the antioxidant effect of FLAVONOID substances in red wine and the protective effect of olive oil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, a third answer to our original question on the French paradox would be that the end of the road does indeed appear to be drawing closer for France.
But the market that emerged as a result of the French Paradox wanted big, drinkable wines now
All these brand news are known as the Coffee Paradox as it is far more important than the French Paradox (www.
Drinking red wine has been suggested as one explanation for the French Paradox - the fact that heart disease death rates are lower in France than in other industrialised countries with similar risk factors.
Red wine has already been identified as a major factor in what is known as the French Paradox where, despite a high fat diet, the French have a lower rate of heart disease than people in the UK, presumably because they drink more red wine.
This was a few years after the second set of information was published on the French paradox in 1992," he said.
Several watershed revelations and regulations have shaken up the food industry recently, some involving trans fats, others obesity, and most recently a discovery that may finally explain the cause of the so-called French Paradox.
AP--Researchers say they have discovered the key component in read wine that explains the so-called French Paradox, or the way the French can eat lots of cheese, buttery sauces and other rich foods and still suffer less heart disease than Americans.
Red wine contains higher amounts of phenolics than white wine, which may partly explain the French paradox.
The wine industry worldwide got a boost in 1991 when the CBS television program "60 Minutes" aired a segment on "the French Paradox.
Acetaldehyde's bad reputation makes it "a provocative answer to the French paradox," notes Raja G.
The French paradox - which suggests drinking lots of red wine and eating loads of Mediterranean food is good for you - is well known.