French


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Related to French: France, French words

French scale (F),

a scale for grading sizes of sounds, tubes, and catheters as based on a diameter of 0.33 mm equaling 1 F on the scale (for example, 3 F = 1 mm); grading to scale is carried out using a metal plate with holes ranging from 0.33 mm to 1 cm in diameter.
Synonym(s): Charrière scale

French

adjective (slang) Referring to oral sex.

verb (slang)
(1) To perform oral sex on someone.
(2) To give an open-mouth (i.e., “French”) kiss.
References in classic literature ?
As I had expected, I found the brave fellow steeped in a profound French calm.
I said I must be allowed to act under a French name, so that I might be shielded from obloquy in my country, in case of fatal results.
German philosophers, would-be philosophers, and beaux esprits, eagerly seized on this literature, only forgetting, that when these writings immigrated from France into Germany, French social conditions had not immigrated along with them.
The world of the German literate consisted solely in bringing the new French ideas into harmony with their ancient philosophical conscience, or rather, in annexing the French ideas without deserting their own philosophic point of view.
While in Paris he had married a second wife, a young French girl, and now brought her to the Province House.
Well," said the first, "I'm after Art too; but I'm after French most.
If he reached Znaim before the French, there would be great hope of saving the army; to let the French forestall him at Znaim meant the exposure of his whole army to a disgrace such as that of Ulm, or to utter destruction.
And I was appalled at the price French Frank had paid--eighty cents.
But even with all his other work, with his trading and ruling to attend to, Caxton found time to read and write, and he began to translate from the French a book of stories called the Recuyell* of the Histories of Troy.
This sentiment was finally to be confirmed by the loss of Normandy and other French possessions of the Norman-English kings in the thirteenth century, a loss which transformed England from a province of the Norman Continental empire and of a foreign nobility into an independent country, and further by the wars ('The Hundred Years' War') which England-Norman nobility and Saxon yeomen fighting together--carried on in France in the fourteenth century.
She and Miss Rose thus read together many delightful French and English works, among which may be mentioned those of the learned Dr.
The little girl tried to say it in French, but could not remember the French for spade; the mother prompted her, and then told her in French where to look for the spade.