French


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Related to French: France, French words

French scale (F),

a scale for grading sizes of sounds, tubes, and catheters as based on a diameter of 0.33 mm equaling 1 F on the scale (for example, 3 F = 1 mm); grading to scale is carried out using a metal plate with holes ranging from 0.33 mm to 1 cm in diameter.
Synonym(s): Charrière scale

French

adjective (slang) Referring to oral sex.

verb (slang)
(1) To perform oral sex on someone.
(2) To give an open-mouth (i.e., “French”) kiss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Childers then draws on newly available Vichy archives to scour the literature of women's groups, family manuals, worker's organizations, and numerous associations to build the crux of her thesis concerning the (dis)continuities between Interwar Vichy (1940-1945) and post-war French welfare policies (chapter 3).
More recently, French intellectuals Robert Redecker and Alain Finkielkraut have faced death threats from Islamic radicals for criticizing Islam and the actions and demands of militant Muslims.
The troops did not have permethrin-impregnated battlefield uniforms as do soldiers in the French Army.
Invoking 1789, as the French often do, Charlotte Billaud, a 21-year-old university student protesting in Paris, said the new labor law would have been like "living beneath a guillotine.
The teacher who wishes to have students read a complete authentic text, written by a French author for French readers, is faced with the challenge of identifying material that is both of interest to students and at their reading proficiency level.
That is why so many French people were shaken when dozens of its cities exploded in riots last autumn.
In 1995, Chirac finally reached the pinnacle of French politics by entering the Elysee Palace thanks to a campaign based on leftist rhetoric against the so-called "social divide" in France between the haves and the have-nots.
Don't hate me because I'm French and, like that new book touts, French Women Don't Get Fat.
To Ziska, the opportunity was obvious--a few major exhibits and a French play, each of which required months of wrangling with directors, art collectors, and international loan agents to stage, were coinciding, and during spring's tourist high-season to boot: This surely called for a French-themed fete.
Longino convincingly argues that these plays served the necessary formation of French "colonial identity in other parts of the world," born of the establishment of footholds in "the Chesapeake Bay (Annapolis, 1603), in Quebec (1608), in Guyana (1609)," among other enterprises (225, 2-3).