Freeman

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Freeman

 [fre´man]
Ruth B. (1906–1982). American educator and author in the field of public health nursing; she served on the faculty at New York University, the School of Public Health at the University of Minnesota, and The Johns Hopkins University. She was the author of many works on public health nursing and administration, including Techniques of Supervision in Public Health Nursing and Community Health Nursing Practice. In addition, she was a member of many professional organizations in the field of public health nursing.

Free·man

(frē'măn),
Ernest A., 1900-1975. See: Freeman-Sheldon syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chairman of the Freemen steward's committee Len Fenwick said: "The bill is at the second reading.
During the Freemen siege, examples of these two issues involved the use of TPIs with credentials and beliefs acceptable to the group.
But the philosophy of the Freemen and one of its leaders, LeRoy Schweitzer, lives on.
The two people not facing charges, wives of Freemen members, were free to go but chose to drive with the group to Billings.
The surrender plan was almost derailed Wednesday when a farmer tried to start planting on 2,300 acres of land, adjacent to the Freemen ranch, which he had bought at a foreclosure sale.
The source said the visit with Schweitzer is part of a larger proposal between the FBI and Freemen that could bring the standoff to a peaceful conclusion by week's end.
And Thursday morning, two federal vehicles pulled up to the compound property, where a man gave a cardboard box to one of the Freemen, who took it away in a pickup truck.
The Freemen have been holed up in a remote, 960-acre farm complex 30 miles northwest of the FBI's headquarters in this eastern Montana town since March 25, when FBI agents captured two of their leaders.
But Fox chairman Roger Ailes claimed that the journalists were being used as scapegoats, adding in a statement that the FBI had planned to remove the media well before his staff made contact with the Freemen.
There isn't anyone in the legitimate patriot movement who doesn't want to see the Freemen out and before the bar of justice,'' Gritz, a retired Green Beret colonel, said in a telephone interview from Nevada.
Montana's assistant attorney general, confirmed that the Freemen had rejected an offer of leniency on state charges in return for their surrender to federal authorities.
The freemen reject almost all government authority.