Sanger, Frederick

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Sanger, Frederick

(1918-) English biochemist who carried out extensive research into protein structure and determined the amino acid sequence of insulin, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1958. He also developed methodology for DNA SEQUENCING and determined the entire nucleotide sequence of a viral DNA for which he shared a second Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1980.

Sanger,

Frederick, English biochemist and twice Nobel laureate, 1918–.
Sanger method - sequencing of DNA by employing an enzyme that can polymerase DNA and labeled nucleotides.
Sanger reagent - Synonym(s): fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene
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Currently, the Society's Honorary Fellows include Dame Muriel Spark, Sir James Black, Joseph Rotblat, Sir Paul Nurse, Lord (George) Robertson, Frederick Sanger, James Watson and Francis Crick.
Contractor address : 19 & 20 Frederick Sanger Road, The Surrey Research Park, Surrey
In 1958, the Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to a British scientist, Frederick Sanger, for the discovery of the amino acid sequence of the insulin molecule (1).
Frederick Sanger, the English biochemist, clearly led the way with the description of sequencing by termination, which won him the Nobel Prize in Chemistry.
Berg, along with his colleagues Walter Gilbert and Frederick Sanger, was honored with the 1980 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for developing methods that make it possible to map the structure and function of DNA.