Frankenfood

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Frankenfood

A popular, generic term of uncertain utility for any food product produced by recombinant DNA technology (e.g., the genetically engineered tomato); fanicifully named after Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.

ge·net·i·cal·ly mod·i·fied food

(jĕ-net'ik-ă-lē mod'i-fīd fūd)
Scientifically altered foodstuffs intended to limit exposure of the plants or animals to disease or spoilage. Concerns about safety and efficacy have been raised worldwide.
Synonym(s): frankenfood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Biotech foods, genetically engineered foods, genetically modified foods and Frankenfoods are names for the scientifically created foods that we are all eating today.
com) The success of the Denver effort in raising the level of debate over Frankenfoods in Colorado has inspired the Organic Consumers Association and a number of Green Party activists to discuss joining efforts with local activists (and national networks such as the Campaign to Label Genetically Engineered Foods) to get city council resolutions and initiatives on the ballot all across the US.
Their scare tactics, including the use of ominous words such as frankenfoods, have created a climate in which many consumers would interpret labels on biotech products to mean that they were somehow more dangerous or less healthy than old-style foods.
Derisively referred to as Frankenfoods or mutant crops, World Trade Organization proposals seek to curb them.
Wind-blown pollen could kill milkweed plants, leaving Monarch butterflies no place to build their cocoons," naysayers add, dubbing the products Frankenfoods.
FRANKENFOODS - those with genetically modified ingredients - are found mostly in budget foods.
Supreme Court reviews genetically modified crops: Professor Jason Czarnezki, whose expertise includes food law and agricultural policy, scrutinizes the Supreme Court's first ruling on so-called Frankenfoods.
See Sean Poulter, Alert Over the March of the "Grey Goo" in Nanotechnology Frankenfoods, DAILY MAIL, Jan.
Human health effects from GMOs have caused less alarm in the scientific community than the biodiversity risks have, (40) but this has not changed the popular stigma associated with Frankenfoods.
With the national press always ready to stoke people's fears about Frankenfoods, demand remains pretty low, says an Asda spokesman.
So-called Frankenfoods have Europeans up in arms, mostly because they are American and cheap.
A student-led effort at high schools and colleges called Appetite for Change seeks not only to ban BGH and other Frankenfoods from school cafeterias, but to transform current food-service policies on campuses, moving away from corporate and animal-factory "pharm foods" to organic, locally produced foods.