Francophobia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Morbid fear of anything French
References in periodicals archive ?
48) Although it now seems paradoxical that he should have expressed his Francophobia in the language of the French, it is perhaps a good illustration of the complexity of the relationship between language and nationality in England during the thirteenth century.
These bonds, reinforced by Francophobia, enabled the British and German organizations together to dominate the International, and facilitated ongoing contacts between German and British pacifists during the First World War.
As for some of John Bull's enemies, see Colley and Newman who discuss English Francophobia as an underlying theme in the rise of English/British nationalism.
Henri Voisin, of the Society of Mary of Tinchebray, victim of Francophobia by the faithful imitator of Irish bishops of the United States: it is racially based.
6) His wish to leave Britain's natural borders intact, however, should not immediately be interpreted as a manifestation of the Francophobia that one sometimes sees in Browning's compatriots.
Most Americans, plagued either by a Francophilia that wants to enlist France's muscular military forces and diplomatic finesse in the war against terrorism, or a Francophobia that condemns France, its history, and all it has ever produced as a spineless and subversive menace beyond any hope of rapprochement, don't seem to be noticing.
French ambassadors in Port Vila during the 1980s faced persistent local Francophobia resulting from the troubled decolonisation of the New Hebrides.
A RECENT ARTICLE in The New York Times describes what is being seen as a possible outbreak of francophobia in the United States, citing a rise in anti-France sentiments in the media.