Francisella


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Related to Francisella: Brucella

Francisella

 [fran″sĭ-sel´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, coccoid or rod-shaped bacteria; F. tularen´sis (formerly called Pasteurella tularensis) is the etiologic agent of tularemia.

Francisella

(fran-si-sel'lă),
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacteria that contain small, gram-negative cocci and rods. Capsules are rarely produced and the cells may show bipolar staining. These organisms are highly pleomorphic; they do not grow on plain agar or in liquid media without special enrichment; they are pathogenic and cause tularemia in humans. The type species is Francisella tularensis.

Francisella

/Fran·ci·sel·la/ (fran″sĭ-sel´ah) a genus of microorganisms, including F. (Pasteurella) tularen´sis, the etiologic agent of tularemia.

Francisella

a genus of nonmotile nonspore-forming gram-negative aerobic bacteria that is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages. Frequently found in natural waters, it can be parasitic in humans, other mammals, birds, and arthropods. The organism causes tularemia in humans.

Fran·ci·sel·la

(fran-si-sel'lă)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacteria that contain small, gram-negative cocci and rods. Capsules are rarely produced, and the cells may show bipolar staining. These organisms are highly pleomorphic; they do not grow on plain agar or in liquid media without special enrichment; they are pathogenic and cause tularemia in humans. The type species is F. tularensis.

Fran·ci·sel·la

(fran-si-sel'lă)
A genus of nonmotile, non-spore-forming, aerobic bacteria that are pathogenic and cause tularemia in humans.

Francisella

a genus of very small gram-negative bacteria.

Francisella tularensis
biotype A (F. tularensis biovar tularensis) is the etiological agent of tularemia; biotype B (F. tularensis biovar holarctica (palaearctica)) is less virulent. Formerly called Pasteurella tularensis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary of specimens and testing for agents of bioterrorism ORGANISM SPECIMENS (VARIES WITH SYMPTOMS) Bacillus anthracis Blood, vesicular fluid, skin scrapings, sputum, rectal swab or feces Clostridium botulinum Feces, enema, gastric aspirate, (toxin) serum (3 ml minimum), tissue Brucella species Blood, bone marrow, liver, spleen, joint fluid, serum Francisella tularensis Blood, respiratory, tissues, serology Yersinia pestis Blood, lower respiratory, tissue; liver, spleen bone marrow, serum Burkholderia mallei Blood, respiratory, tissues, serum Burkholderia pseudomallei Blood, respiratory, tissues, serum, urine Staphylococcus aureus Nasal wash, induced sputum, urine, (enterotoxin B producer) feces, gastric aspirate, post-mortem tissue, serum, S.
Azithromycin effectiveness against intracellular infections of Francisella.
Standardized broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Francisella tularensis subsp.
While Francisella has been a priority agent for biodefense vaccine developers, there is limited data regarding the molecular determinants against which a vaccine should be targeted.
Three subspecies of Francisella tularensis have been recognized as causes of disease in humans: ssp.
Catharine Bosio at Colorado State University (CSU) involves the development of prophylactic and therapeutic approach for the treatment of Francisella tularensis (Tularemia), a category A Biodefense priority pathogen.
The PathAlert Detection System can be used by government, military and research organizations for accurate detection of infectious agents such as Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), Yersinia pestis (plague), Vaccinia (smallpox simulant) and Francisella tularensis (tularemia) in samples collected from the air, food and water.
polyphaga mimivirus that was recognized in serum of patients infected by Francisella tularensis (8).
SRI International, an independent nonprofit research and development organization, today announced it has performed a series of important computational analyses that report the complete genome sequence of Francisella tularensis, a bacterium that causes tularemia, or "rabbit fever" in animals and humans.
To the Editor: Francisella tularensis, the etiologic agent of tularemia, is a highly infectious zoonotic agent.
His most recent publication "The Complete Genome Sequence of Francisella Tularensis, The Causative Agent of Tularemia" was published in Nature Genetics in January 2005.
Coxiella burnetii, and Francisella tularensis were negative.