quantile

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quan·tile

(kwahn'til),
Division of a distribution into equal, ordered subgroups; deciles are tenths, quartiles are quarters, quintiles are fifths, terciles are thirds, centiles are hundredths.
[L. quantum, how much, + -ilis, adj. suffix]

quan·tile

(kwahn'tīl)
Division or distribution into equal, ordered subgroups; deciles are tenths, quartiles are quarters, quintiles are fifths, terciles are thirds, centiles are hundredths.
[L. quantum, how much, + -ilis, adj. suffix]

quantile

division of a total into equal subgroups; includes terciles, quartiles, quintiles, deciles, percentiles.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The points compared may represent the advantage enjoyed by a group, a natural person, or a representative person, such as the average person in a given fractile of the population.
regard to pressure definitions and terminology, characteristic material properties, partial safety factors and fractile values, and supplementary material requirements.
For calibration of the load model LM1 proposed in Eurocode 1: Actions on Structures--Part 2: Traffic Loads on Bridges the actual traffic load values are used with the return period of 1000 years, or 5% lower and 95% upper fractile value of the Gaussian statistical distribution diagram.
It s a mathematical mosaic, a mobile net that would run and break without repeating: a wholly modern concept of a tile, a fractile.
Values of v and D from all depths were combined and used to construct fractile diagrams.
Following Piketty and Saez (2003), we disaggregate the structure of the labor share associated with wages and salaries, and proprietors' income, by fractile of the population.
These cost-overrun percentage fractiles and the PM-assessed distribution fractile, i.
Then, we compute a monthly value-weighted buy-and-hold return for each of the 125 fractile portfolios.
98] is the characteristic fractile factor of these distributions [7, 12].
It should be noted that the risk of hearing handicap due to noise calculated by this method does not indicate the severity of the hearing handicap as such, but gives the fractile of a population whose hearing threshold level associated with age and noise exceeds the fence.
Lindsey's (1987) approach assumes taxpayers remain in the same income fractile in successive periods.