founder effect

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found·er ef·fect

an unusually high frequency of a gene in a particular population derived from a small set of unrepresentative ancestors.

founder effect

n.
A random difference in allele frequencies of a population founded by a small group of organisms relative to the allele frequencies in the original population.

founder effect

the result of starting a new population with a low number of individuals (founders), so that their GENE POOL may not contain the same proportions of ALLELES for a particular LOCUS as in the original population. For example, instead of containing three alleles of the ABO BLOOD GROUP locus, Australian aborigines contain no B alleles and thus no Group B or Group AB individuals are produced, a situation probably caused by a ‘founder effect’. Such small founder populations are subject to RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT.

founder effect

extreme genetic drift that occurs when a new population is based on only a few individuals ('founders'). Called also founder principle.
References in periodicals archive ?
We found documentation that links the founding population of beavers to the province of Manitoba in Canada.
15) The Beringia model, or "Clovis first model," states that founding populations from Siberia, following the big game animals, entered the New World approximately 11,000 YBP.
That pattern is consistent with a scenario in which moose populations worldwide trace back to recent population expansion combined with small sizes of founding populations (Hundertmark et al.
Seeds of that diversity germinated from the founding populations that moved across the Bering land bridge at the end of the Ice Age, so the ancestral population must have been a complex mix of people, Schurr says.
The available data on ecological parameters such as local population sizes, migration rates, size and structure of founding populations, as well as extinction and colonization rates are even more limited.
This, however, would imply either that one of the founding population was characterized by the occurrence of the unique haplotype 106, and that this population was not involved in the recolonization of any of the other nearby lakes connecting to the same river drainage, or that this haplotype vanished everywhere else.
Analyses of DNA sequences from larger numbers of Asians and Native Americans could yield different estimates of the founding population in the New World, Schurr adds.
Assuming that the selfing rate has been at about the levels measured in extant populations ([greater than or equal to] 98%) over this time, then it seems unlikely that linkage disequilibrium existed in the founding population.
He estimates that it took just a few thousand years for a founding population of 600 Stone Age people to travel from what's now India to southeastern Asia and then to Australia.
The analysis indicated that within 400 years of entering Europe, the founding population split into at least three major groups: One stayed in the Balkan Mountains, another pressed north of the Danube River, and the third moved on to Western Europe.
In contrast, disruptive selection would be invoked if variation in differentiation of ecotypes among lakes reflects the local potential for adaptive diversification from a single founding population.
Mexico harbored that founding population, in Pope's view.