founder effect

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Related to Founding population: Founder principle, Founder event, Founder population, Effective founder population

found·er ef·fect

an unusually high frequency of a gene in a particular population derived from a small set of unrepresentative ancestors.

founder effect

n.
A random difference in allele frequencies of a population founded by a small group of organisms relative to the allele frequencies in the original population.

founder effect

the result of starting a new population with a low number of individuals (founders), so that their GENE POOL may not contain the same proportions of ALLELES for a particular LOCUS as in the original population. For example, instead of containing three alleles of the ABO BLOOD GROUP locus, Australian aborigines contain no B alleles and thus no Group B or Group AB individuals are produced, a situation probably caused by a ‘founder effect’. Such small founder populations are subject to RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT.

founder effect

extreme genetic drift that occurs when a new population is based on only a few individuals ('founders'). Called also founder principle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Seeds of that diversity germinated from the founding populations that moved across the Bering land bridge at the end of the Ice Age, so the ancestral population must have been a complex mix of people, Schurr says.
To find out how long ago and how many Indonesian settlers there when the island's population was founded, the team ran various computer simulations that started out with different founding populations at different times until the results matched their real-life data.
mtDNA variation indicates Mongolia may have been the source for the founding population for the New World.
Accordingly, the distinct linguistic and cultural groups emerged after the expansion and radiation of the founding population throughout North, Central, and South America.
While their North American populations may have overlapped for only a few generations, members of the Dorset and Thule cultures shared genetic similarities that point to a common, founding population in Siberia.
Recently colonized areas would be expected to show less genetic diversity than areas with long-established populations, particularly if the effective size of the founding population was low.
A geneticist armed with computer simulations of prehistoric populations says that only about 200 to 300 people crossed the ice age land bridge from Asia to become the founding population of North America.