foundation

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foun·da·tion

(fown-dā'shŭn),
A base; a supporting structure.

foundation

/foun·da·tion/ (foun-da´shun) the structure or basis on which something is built.
denture foundation  the portion of the structures and tissues of the mouth available to support a denture.

foundation

Etymology: L, fundamentum
(in dentistry) any device or material added to a remaining tooth structure to enhance the stability and retention of an overlying cast restoration, such as a pin retainer, amalgam, or casting.

foun·da·tion

(fown-dā'shŭn)
A base; a supporting structure.

foun·da·tion

(fown-dā'shŭn)
A base; a supporting structure.

foundation,

n 1. a charitable organization usually established to allocate private funds to worthy projects or to provide other services.
2. in dentistry, any device or material added to a remaining tooth structure to enhance the stability and retention of an overlying cast restoration. May be a pin retainer of amalgam, plastic cement, or a casting.

Patient discussion about foundation

Q. What is the foundation of a good and healthy nutrition?

A. Balance - balanced nutrition that contains carbs (40-50%), fat (20-30%) and protein (15%), as well as vitamins, iron and sufficient amounts of water. However these are only general advices, so you may want to consult a professional (e.g. dietitian)

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/nutrition.html

More discussions about foundation
References in classic literature ?
But there was a story, for which it is difficult to conceive any foundation, that the posterity of Matthew Maule had some connection with the mystery of the looking-glass, and that, by what appears to have been a sort of mesmeric process, they could make its inner region all alive with the departed Pyncheons; not as they had shown themselves to the world, nor in their better and happier hours, but as doing over again some deed of sin, or in the crisis of life's bitterest sorrow.
He tendered for part of the foundations in the Opera.
Hardly had my foot touched the talisman when the air became as dark as night, a fearful noise was heard, and the palace shook to its very foundations.
Thomas Jefferson believed that to preserve the very foundations of our nation we would need dramatic change from time to time.
When the jealous and niggardly policy of their British sovereign denied them even that humblest of requests, and instead of liberty would barely consent to promise connivance, neither he nor they might be aware that they were laying the foundations of a power, and that he was sowing the seeds of a spirit, which, in less than two hundred years, would stagger the throne of his descendants, and shake his united kingdoms to the centre.
Guest, his head clerk, upon the other, and midway between, at a nicely calculated distance from the fire, a bottle of a particular old wine that had long dwelt unsunned in the foundations of his house.
The students, at least, swore by his name, and Fettes believed himself, and was believed by others, to have laid the foundations of success when he had acquired the favour of this meteorically famous man.
States that rise unexpectedly, then, like all other things in nature which are born and grow rapidly, cannot leave their foundations and correspondencies[*] fixed in such a way that the first storm will not overthrow them; unless, as is said, those who unexpectedly become princes are men of so much ability that they know they have to be prepared at once to hold that which fortune has thrown into their laps, and that those foundations, which others have laid BEFORE they became princes, they must lay AFTERWARDS.
I have already mentioned that the dwellings of the islanders were almost invariably built upon massive stone foundations, which they call pi-pis.
And surely a man shall see the noblest works and foundations have proceeded from childless men; which have sought to express the images of their minds, where those of their bodies have failed.
From the time the first person said and proved that the number of births or of crimes is subject to mathematical laws, and that this or that mode of government is determined by certain geographical and economic conditions, and that certain relations of population to soil produce migrations of peoples, the foundations on which history had been built were destroyed in their essence.
Baggs looked at it--lost in an instant some of the fine color plentifully diffused over her face by sleep and spirits--sat down in the nearest chair with a thump that seemed to threaten the very foundations of Number Two, Zion Place--and stared me hard in the face; the most speechless and helpless elderly female I ever beheld.

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