foster care

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foster care

The care of individuals who cannot live independently (such as children, homeless families, or frail elderly people) in a group or private home.
See also: care
References in periodicals archive ?
Chuck Grassley, co-founder and co-chair of the Senate Caucus on Foster Youth, Sen.
To learn more about Aspiranet's services for foster youth, visit www.
Legislation aimed at easing the financial burden faced by caregivers when foster youth obtain driver's licenses is making its way through the Florida Senate.
For example, the City of San Francisco's Transitional Youth Task Force and the joint city-county Human Services Agency work together to help former foster youth continue their education, find housing or jobs, attain health insurance and accumulate assets.
One-third of former foster youth and one-half of crossover youth experienced a period of extreme poverty during their young adult years with extremely low earnings.
In January, President Obama included recommendations from foster youth in his 2015 budget.
The program also connects our community with foster youth and helps build a deeper understanding/awareness of what it means to be a child in care.
Over the past several years, the Field Center has been working with local colleges and universities in the Philadelphia area to raise awareness about the sorts of challenges that former foster youth face while at school.
But Director Vicki Pleasant of the Charleston-based crisis intervention nonprofit organization Daymark, said it would be easier to help foster youth attend an existing two- or four-year college.
We are especially grateful for the support we have received from the District Board of Trustees that will allow us to admit up to 100 foster youth and youth from underserved communities in the County into this program.
Yesterday (May 26), the Department released a toolkit to inspire and support foster youth pursuing college and career opportunities.
But that might not be the case for one segment of the Texas population with persistently high teen pregnancy rates: foster youth.

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