foster care

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Related to Foster children: Foster youth

foster care

The care of individuals who cannot live independently (such as children, homeless families, or frail elderly people) in a group or private home.
See also: care
References in periodicals archive ?
The overmedication of foster children with psychotropic drugs has been a hot-button issue in the state since 2004, when then-Comptroller Carole Keeton Strayhorn released the report "Forgotten Children.
Anyone watching foster children should know how to contact emergency assistance.
In an interview yesterday, Marylou Sudders, president and CEO of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children, said there are about 5,000 families in the state with whom foster children live.
Missouri would join at least 18 states in offering college aid to foster children.
Unlike their peers in traditional families, many foster children do not have an adequate safety net or social network; they cannot rely on parents or other relatives to facilitate a smooth transition out of the home and into adulthood.
Agencies, however, train foster parents to maintain emotional distance from their foster children and to expect sudden, draconian disruptions in the placement.
Adoption is increasingly presented not as an option for a minority of foster children who cannot be reunited with their parents, but as the preferred outcome for all children in foster care.
Here he recalls his own experiences and finds out whether fostering works any better today, with compelling contributions from today's foster children and experts in the field.
The county made a lot of unwarranted assumptions, both about people with AIDS and about foster children," said the plaintiffs' lawyer, Matthew Gutt of Philadelphia.
Under it, councils can only place foster children with couples which comprise a man and a woman or with people living alone.
It is therefore plausible that the economic situation of a large proportion of the population in 1870 was so precarious that relatives and kin were not in a position to foster children if parents failed to provide for them.