address

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address

Informatics
The alphanumeric code for the location of point of communication on the Internet or an intranet.
 
Molecular biology
A site on a chromosome with a ‘character set’ of ≥ 16 base pairs which, at 416, makes that address unique, and unlikely to occur more than once on the genome.

Professional communication
A speech, oration or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may be didactic in nature.

address

pronounced uh-DRESS Professional communication A speech, oration, or written statement directed to a particular group of persons; to be differentiated from a lecture, which may have a didactic end. See Keynote address, National Library of Medicine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Talk to elders: Social structure, attitudes and forms of address.
Attempting to delineate differences among the three genre varieties (tragedy, historical drama and comedy) as much as it is reflected in the sense and significance of address in them, the distribution of forms of address expressing positive and negative politeness will be considered.
The employment of forms of abuse with or without qualifying words as forms of address (e.
Since these forms of address have no bearing on human relations and since the sense of such forms of address is essentially contextual, they were identified by the classical term "apostrophe" in Shakespeare's plays, without further specification of relations implied.
The distribution of positive and negative politeness as expressed by address is more or less regular throughout the play, with no more than three forms of address in succession expressing positive politeness followed by as many or fewer forms of address expressing negative politeness.
Like in Macbeth, in this drama the scenes in which forms of address creating positive and negative politeness interchange regularly are of less significance.
Negative politeness expressed by the standard but distancing forms of address among relations conveys the confusion of the King and his mother Elinor in this scene and their reserved attitude to the bluntly spoken Bastard Philip Falconbridge.
The exchange of the emphatically negative forms of address conveys the sense of independence between the arguing parties -- women of the royal families of England and France.
Negative politeness as expressed by address here implies the Lords' composure, anger and individual responsibility, their shock at the Prince's death and wrath, and the forms of address are most of them exceptional and low.