Forestier's disease

Forestier's disease

[fō′restē·āz′]
Etymology: Jacques Forestier, French neurologist,1890-1978
hyperostosis of the anterolateral part of the vertebral column, especially in the thoracic region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier's disease, was originally reported by Forestier and Rotes-Querol in 1950.
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) (also called ankylosing hyperostosis, Forestier's disease, or spondylitis ossificans ligamentosa) is an age-related chronic condition whose principal manifestation is new bone formation without degenerative, traumatic, or postinfection changes (1).
Forestier's disease, (Forestier-Ott syndrome, Forestier and Rotes-Querol syndrome) "is a condition fairly common in older men, marked by widespread ossification in spinal ligaments and tendons.