cultural assimilation

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cultural assimilation

[kul′chərəl]
a process by which members of an ethnic minority group lose cultural characteristics that distinguish them from the dominant cultural group or take on the cultural characteristics of another group.
References in periodicals archive ?
that] amount to a widespread campaign of intimidation and forced assimilation.
With Stalinism, however, a strong policy of forced assimilation and integration prevailed, thereby opening the path for all future emigrations, including the ones of the 1970s and 1980s.
To say that "pathological homogenization" is forced assimilation, forced deportation or ethnic cleansing, and genocide does not help us understand how and why the state and its political leadership sometimes transgress the border between the normal modes of homogenization and pathological ones.
Helsinki Commission Co-Chairman Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell (R-CO), who also serves as the Senate Indian Affairs Committee Chairman drew parallels between the historic plight of Roma and Native Americans, which has included forced assimilation, forced migration and slaughter.
Voluntary and forced assimilation and the cataclysmic results of the Holocaust led to the rapid decline of Yiddish and to the near disappearance of its theater in the post World War II era.
The TRC aims to provide former students and their families with a chance to share their experiences, and to set the historical record straight about the 150-year legacy of forced assimilation of native people through the residential schools.
However, it is a fundamental argument that the process of these political transformations from the forced assimilation and excessive repressions of empires to the birth of federalism and respecting pluralism and individuality of each nation wasn't an easy task.
On the other side, I see Koheleth (like Ruth) as a work written during the threat of forced assimilation to the Hellenistic culture under the Seleucid rule.
According to various estimates, between 500 and 1,500 people were killed resisting forced assimilation between 1984 and 1989, and thousands of others moved to labor camps.
For instance, Fordham and Ogbu (1986) argued that Black students from all socioeconomic backgrounds develop "oppositional identities" that lead them to view schooling as a form of forced assimilation to White cultural values, and they come to equate academic success with "acting White.
France as a government and a people does have problems dealing with certain cultural minorities, such as the Bretons and the Basques, who have a long history of persecution and forced assimilation.
As the title suggests, this work raises some disquieting implications for current issues, including the legacy of residential schools and other means of forced assimilation (chap.