bacterial food poisoning

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bac·te·ri·al food poi·son·ing

a term commonly used to refer to conditions limited to enteritis or gastroenteritis (excluding the enteric fevers and the dysenteries) caused by bacterial multiplication itself or by a soluble bacterial exotoxin.

bacterial food poisoning

a toxic condition resulting from the ingestion of food contaminated by certain bacteria. Acute infectious gastroenteritis caused by various species of Salmonella is characterized by fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and general discomfort beginning 8 to 48 hours after ingestion and continuing for several days. Similar symptoms caused by Staphylococcus, usually S. aureus, appear much sooner and rarely last more than a few hours. Food poisoning caused by the neurotoxin of Clostridium botulinum is characterized by GI symptoms, disturbances of vision, weakness or paralysis of muscles, and, in severe cases, respiratory failure. See also botulism.

bac·te·ri·al food poi·son·ing

(bak-tēr'ē-ăl fūd poy'zŏn-ing)
A term commonly used to refer to conditions limited to enteritis or gastroenteritis (excluding the enteric fevers and the dysenteries) caused by bacterial multiplication itself or by a soluble bacterial exotoxin.

bac·te·ri·al food poi·son·ing

(bak-tēr'ē-ăl fūd poy'zŏn-ing)
Term commonly used to refer to conditions limited to enteritis or gastroenteritis (excluding the enteric fevers and the dysenteries) caused by bacterial multiplication itself or by a soluble bacterial exotoxin.

bacterial

pertaining to or caused by bacteria.

bacterial adhesiveness
bacterial allergy
see bacterial hypersensitivity.
cutaneous bacterial granuloma
bacterial diseases
diseases in which bacteria play a significant but not necessarily exclusive role.
bacterial fermentation
fermentation is more commonly a function of yeasts but is performed by some bacteria, e.g. those in the rumen. See also fermentation.
bacterial food poisoning
see food poisoning.
bacterial gill disease
see gill disease.
bacterial kidney disease of fish
a serious disease of salmonid cultures characterized by granuloma in the kidney and spleen, and extensive caseation of muscles. The disease is chronic and causes heavy losses. The cause appears to be a minute gram-positive coccobacillus Renibacterium salmoninarum.
bacterial overgrowth
a syndrome of malabsorption causing chronic or recurrent diarrhea in dogs. Believed to be due to the presence in the small intestine of an abnormally large population of Clostridium spp. and other enteric bacteria normally found in the colon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also,report the suspected foodborne illness to FDA in either of these ways:
These data include foodborne illness and many other infectious diseases and can be used for public health surveillance.
The objectives of the MFSFS initiative were to a) determine the baseline nutrition education and food safety needs of limited- or fixed-income seniors, food handlers in senior services and in-home caregivers, b) increase the food safety knowledge and skills of the study group, c) increase public awareness of the higher risk of foodborne illness among elders, d) use the findings to create senior-friendly curricula and materials to help reduce the risk of foodborne illness and e) promote healthy food practices for vulnerable elders in local California counties.
those most likely to suffer from a foodborne illness and to suffer serious complications or mortality as a result.
The government attributes a decline of foodborne illness to better food industry practices such as new and advanced technologies that inhibit the growth of microorganisms.
Food Microbiology" covers the three main aspects of interaction between micro-organisms and food-spoilage, foodborne illness and fermentation, and the positive and negative features that result.
This is especially true if you belong to one of the major groups at risk from foodborne illness.
Whether you represent food producers concerned about liability or plaintiffs harmed by a foodborne illness, this unique book will help you handle any issue.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reminds people with diabetes (and those preparing food for them) about the importance of safe food handling in preventing foodborne illness.
Around 68% of foodborne illness outbreaks occur at restaurants (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013).
A new online course on foodborne illness outbreak environmental assessments is now available for public health practitioners.
The economic burden of foodborne illness includes the cost of any health care required, productivity losses and lost trade, incurred as a result of restrictions placed on trade if contaminated food is identified as the source and cause of an outbreak of foodborne illness.