foodborne


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Related to foodborne: foodborne botulism

foodborne

adjective Referring to that which is carried by food, either pathogens—viruses (HAV), bacteria (e.g., salmonellosis), parasites (e.g., anisakiasis)—toxins (e.g., botulinum, aflatoxin B1) or chemicals (e.g., lead, organophosphates).

foodborne

adjective Referring to that which is carried by food, either by pathogens: viruses–HAV, bacteria–eg salmonellosis, parasites–eg anisakiasis, toxins–eg botulinum, aflatoxin B1 or chemicals–eg organophosphates, lead. See Foodborne pathogen. Cf Fomite.

foodborne

infection or other damaging agent transmitted via the animal's (or human's) food chain.
References in periodicals archive ?
We're here to remind you how to keep your dining safe," says Deirdre Schlunegger, CEO of Stop Foodborne Illness.
This year, CDC is focusing on raising awareness about these groups at high risk for foodborne illnesses.
Thus, recent and valid data are available to estimate the population-level health effects of several foodborne pathogens.
Overall, there were more than 24,000 foodborne infections, more than 5,500 hospitalizations and nearly 100 deaths in 2016.
Whether you are trick-or-treating or throwing a party for your friends and neighbors, STOP Foodborne Illness wants you to be aware of the dangers that can arise from food this Halloween.
When theres an outbreak of foodborne illness, the biggest challenge facing public health officials is the speed at which they can identify the contaminated food source and alert the public, said Kun Hu, public health research scientist, IBM Research Almaden in San Jose, Calif.
With the Chipotle situation still fresh in our minds, it's worth revisiting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics on foodborne illness.
The World Health Organization in Geneva is publishing the report, Estimates of the Global Burden of Foodborne Diseases, today (03 Dec).
The risks posed by pesticides in food pale in comparison to the risks from foodborne illness," said Carl Winter, extension food toxicologist and vice chair of the Department of Food Science and Technology at the University of California at Davis.
There are two major groups of foodborne illnesses: known foodborne pathogens and unspecified agents.
PEOPLE being treated for cancer are more vulnerable to foodborne illness and its serious complications.