thickening agent

(redirected from Food thickener)

thickening agent

Any substance added to a liquid to increase its viscosity without substantially altering its other properties (e.g., taste, clarity) or its responses to chemical (e.g., altered pH) or physical conditions (e.g., low temperatures).
References in periodicals archive ?
There is renewed commercial interest in seaweed, with an identified need for diverse products in addition to the commonly produced carrageenan (used as a food thickener and stabiliser).
1 pound walnut pieces 1 quart whole milk 1 cup plus 6 tablespoons heavy cream 11 ounces granulated sugar 1/2 teaspoons salt 2/3 ounce tapioca maltodextrin 1/2 ounce Thick and Easy [R] instant food thickener
Melbourne, July 14 (ANI): In a novel study, Australian researchers are using food thickener used in yoghurts and jellies to develop artificial muscle.
For complete information on the new Thick-It purees and Thick-It Instant Food Thickener, visit www.
SELT Marine of France has developed a new extraction process for the production of semi-refined Carrageenan, a natural food thickener.
A protein-based food thickener offers unusual nutritional advantages over conventional starch-thickening systems.
NECTAR & HONEY GEL FOOD THICKENER, Simply Thick LLC
This is important because its usefulness in cosmetics may require bleaching, and application in oil recovery or as a food thickener would require it to thicken over a wide pH range," says Abbott.
NEW YORK -- Attorneys Wendy Fleishman and Paulina do Amaral of the national plaintiffs' law firm Lieff Cabraser Heimann & Bernstein, LLP, announced that Devon Addonizio of New York, New York, today filed a personal injury lawsuit charging that contaminated SimplyThick infant food thickener caused her daughter catastrophic and permanent injuries.
A protein-based food thickener offers unique nutritional advantages over conventional starch thickening systems, but the higher costs associated with a WPI-derivitized thickener may limit its applications.
Food thickeners are mostly derived either from polysaccharides such as starches, vegetable gums, and pectin or proteins.