Food Guide Pyramid


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Related to Food Guide Pyramid: Food groups

Food Guide Pyramid

Recommendations developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for planning a balanced diet. Foods are divided into six groups: bread, cereal, rice, and pasta; fruits; vegetables; milk, yogurt, and cheese; meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, and nuts; and fats, oils, and sweets. The guide recommends the number of servings for each food group, and suggests that regular physical activity is an important part of nutritional health.

Food Guide Pyr·a·mid

(fūd gīd pir'ă-mid)
U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines for sound nutrition that emphasize grains, vegetables, and fruits and downplay food sources high in animal protein, lipids, and dairy products.
Synonym(s): MyPyramid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The overall nutrition knowledge score was separated into 3 sections: food-appropriate Food Guide Pyramid food group, nutrient-food association, and nutrient-job association.
The best advice is to use the Food Guide Pyramid as your guide and offer kids a variety of nutritious foods.
Dietary intake was dichotomized by those satisfying the Food Guide Pyramid recommendations for minimum number of servings for each food group (bread, cereal, rice, pasta = 6; fruit = 2; vegetables = 3; milk, yogurt, cheese = 2; meat, poultry, fish, dry beans, eggs, nuts = 2).
The next level on the Food Guide Pyramid contains vegetables and fruits.
Since the most recent USDA Food Guide Pyramid for Young Children Ages 2-6 recognizes soy and tofu as alternatives in the milk and meat food groups, it's getting easier to incorporate vegetarianism into classroom nutrition lessons.
Adapt the Food Guide Pyramid to varying patient conditions and cultural backgrounds.
Use the Food Guide Pyramid and the Nutrition Facts panel on food labels as handy references.
The Food Guide Pyramid calls for 6-11 daily servings of starches, 3-5 daily servings of vegetables, and 2-4 daily servings of fruit.
In contrast to the new Mediterranean Diet Pyramid, the federal government's USDA Food Guide pyramid does not yet acknowledge the potential benefits of moderate wine or ethanol consumption.
USDA has developed a new Food Guide Pyramid graphic to visually illustrate the proportions of each food group that form a healthful diet--as science currently understands such a diet to be.
The Guide to Senior Health and Wellness provides nutritional information and tips for seniors, plus a food guide pyramid adjusted for older adults