Mini-Mental State Examination

(redirected from Folstein test)

Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE),

widely used written assessment instrument that measures and evaluates cognitive function and mental impairment. Often given serially to gauge the effect of time on patients' condition.

Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)

a brief psychological test designed to differentiate among dementia, psychosis, and affective disorders. It may include ability to count backward by 7s from 100, to identify common objects such as a pencil and a watch, to write a sentence, to spell simple words backward, and to demonstrate orientation by identifying the day, month, and year, as well as town and country.

Mi·ni-Men·tal State Ex·am·i·na·tion

(MMSE) (min'ē men'tăl stāt' eg-zam'i-nā'shŭn)
Widely used written assessment instrument that measures and evaluates cognitive function and mental impairment. Often given serially to gauge the effect of time on patients' condition.

Mini-Mental State Examination

Abbreviation: MMSE
A common test to quantify a person's cognitive ability. It assesses orientation, registration, attention, calculation, and language. Scoring is from 0 to 30, with 30 indicating intact cognition.
See also: examination
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mini Mental Status Examination or Folstein Test is an 11-item test used to measure current cognitive functioning and determine the presence of cognitive impairment in older adults in hospitals, institutions, or community dwellings (Folstein, Folstein, & McHugh, 1975; Kurlowicz & Wallace, 1999).
The acupuncture patients scored better on two tests related to memory and dementia - Folstein test, a 30-point questionnaire used to measure mental impairment, and picture recognition.
Seventy-five subjects who had scored above 8 on the Blessed test, below 24 on the Folstein test, or who had demonstrated impaired judgment or greater than mild short-term memory impairment on the Neurobehavioral Congitive Status test were excluded from the analysis.