taxonomy

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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

/tax·on·o·my/ (tak-son´ah-me) the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.taxonom´ic
numerical taxonomy  a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.

taxonomy

[takson′əmē]
Etymology: Gk, taxis, arrangement, nomos, rule
a system for classifying organisms according to their natural relationships on the basis of such common factors as embryology, structure, or physiological chemistry. The system has seven main levels, or taxa, each more comprehensive than those below it: kingdom, phylum (or division), class, order, family, genus, and species. Humans are members of the species Homo sapiens, of the genus Homo, in the family Hominidae in the order Primates, in the class Mammalia, in the phylum Chordata, in the kingdom Animalia. taxonomic, adj.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.

taxonomy

classification by categorization into specific and logical groups, e.g. classification of living organisms to show similarity/evolutionary relationships, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, subspecies, variety

taxonomy (ta·ksôˑ·n·mē),

n 1., any specialized method of classifying objects or events.
2., scientific system used to classify living organisms.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy (takson´əmē),

n a system for classifying organisms on the basis of natural relationships and assigning them appropriate names.

taxonomy

the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.

numerical taxonomy
a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast to subject cataloging, folksonomy is a reflection of personal preference.
It is appropriate to define folksonomy by using Wikipedia, which is a very good example of a work that is maintained by a social network of individual contributors.
One of the fastest growing folksonomy communities is del.
Narrow folksonomy has more of a focus on the individual user.
Whether tags are created individually or collaboratively, what can folksonomy achieve?
Both traditional cataloging and folksonomy can be useful, and both systems are being refined to relieve some of their inherent shortcomings.
But folksonomy also allows an object to be labelled by its characteristic attributes or features, and not by the categories to which it belongs.
Folksonomy is based on a relaxation of the relationships between the term and the index.
Folksonomy can therefore be seen as a fundamental movement that expands the collaborative process, by granting users the power to index content, hence returning a certain degree of control to users.
An original aspect of the relationship structure of folksonomy site is the fact that it is three-way: there are the resources (the content), tags and users.
An indirect consequence of this advantage is that 'broad' folksonomy allows a population to be broken down into affinity groups according to the descriptive vocabulary they use; this is a convenient tool for matching similar individuals, that is, people who have similar systems for perceiving and categorising the world.
Vander Wal emphasises the fact that broad folksonomy systems are based, above all, on the placing of importance on social grouping properties, where connections between individuals are achieved on a basis of breaking down the population into groups with similar perception concepts.