focal seizure

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Related to Focal seizures: status epilepticus

seizure

 [se´zhur]
1. the sudden attack or recurrence of a disease.
2. a convulsion or attack of epilepsy.
absence seizure the seizure seen in petit mal epilepsy, marked by a momentary break in the stream of thought and activity, accompanied by a symmetrical spike and wave at 3 cycles per second on the electroencephalogram. Called also petit malseizure. See epilepsy.
atonic seizure an absence seizure characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone.
complex partial seizure see partial seizure.
febrile seizure febrile convulsion.
focal seizure partial seizure.
focal motor seizure a simple partial seizure consisting of clonus or spasm of a muscle or muscle group, occurring either singly or in a continuous repetitive series.
generalized tonic-clonic seizure (grand mal seizure) the seizure seen in grand mal epilepsy, marked by loss of consciousness and generalized tonic convulsions followed by clonic convulsions. See epilepsy.
jackknife s's infantile spasms.
myoclonic seizure one characterized by a brief episode of myoclonus.
partial seizure any seizure due to a lesion in a specific, known area of the cerebral cortex; symptoms vary with different lesion locations. A simple partial seizure is the most localized type, with a discharge that is predominantly one-sided or presents localized features without loss of consciousness. A complex partial seizure is associated with disease of the temporal lobe and characterized by varying degrees of impairment of consciousness. See epilepsy.
petit mal seizure absence seizure.
reflex seizure (sensory seizure) an epileptic seizure in response to a sensory stimulus, which may be tactile, visual, auditory, or musical.
simple partial seizure see partial seizure.
tonic-clonic seizure see generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

focal seizure

n.
A seizure that originates from a localized area of the cerebral cortex, involves neurologic symptoms specific to the affected area of the brain, and may progress to a generalized seizure. Also called partial seizure.

focal seizure

Etymology: L, focus, hearth; OFr, seisir
a transitory disturbance in motor, sensory, or autonomic function that results from abnormal neuronal discharges in a localized part of the brain, most frequently motor or sensory areas adjacent to the central sulcus. Focal motor seizures commonly begin as spasmodic movements in the hand, face, or foot. Abnormal neuronal discharges that arise in the motor area that controls mastication and salivation may be manifested by chewing, lip smacking, swallowing movements, and profuse salivation. Abnormal electrical activity in the sensory strip of the cortex may be evident initially as a numb, prickling, tingling, or crawling feeling, and the neuronal discharge may spread to motor areas. See also epilepsy, motor seizure.

seizure

1. the sudden attack or recurrence of a disease.
2. a convulsion or attack of epilepsy.

audiogenic seizure
a seizure brought on by sound.
cerebral seizure
an attack of epilepsy.
epileptiform seizure
focal seizure
see partial seizure (below).
generalized seizure
see grand mal seizure (below).
grand mal seizure
one with no localizing signs. After a brief period of restlessness, there is unconsciousness, generalized muscular activity, excessive salivation, chewing activity, opisthotonos, running movements, and often urination and defecation. The most common type of seizure in dogs and cats.
Jacksonian seizure
partial seizure
one restricted to a focus in the brain; signs correspond to the area affected, e.g. motor activity of an isolated area or limb, hallucinations such as fly catching, apparent blindness, behavioral abnormalities, etc. Called also focal seizures.
petit mal seizure
a mild, very brief generalized seizure. See also petit mal.
photogenic seizure
a seizure brought on by light.
psychomotor seizure
motor seizures accompanied by a psychic stage. There are hallucinations, salivation, pupillary dilatation, mastication, fecal and urinary excretion, and wild running. Seen in dogs with lesions in the pyriform lobe or hippocampus and from poisoning with agenized flour (canine hysteria). Called also running fits.
tetanic seizure
see tetany.
seizure threshold
the level of stimulation at which a seizure is precipitated.
tonic seizure
one in which the muscles are rigid.
tonic-clonic seizure
alternating tonic (rigid muscles) and clonic (jerking of muscles) phases; a grand mal seizure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Focal seizures are short-lived and often referred to as an aura or warning sign, preceding a focal dyscognitive or generalized tonic clonic seizure (known as the ictal phase).
Generalized seizures (58%) 58/100 were most common followed by (32%) 32/100 focal seizures, (4%) 4/100 absence, (4%) 4/100 unclassified, (1%) 1/100 myoclonic seizures and (1%) 1/100 infantile spasm (table-I).
Examples include children with a suspected benign focal seizure disorder and unusual syncopal events.
Differentiating Todd's paralysis from stroke is complicated by the fact that some strokes trigger focal seizures during the acute phase.
Unilateral pupillary dilatation during focal seizures.
Fourteen chapters cover optimal use of the EEG and brain imaging in diagnosis and management, principles of therapy, neonatal seizures and syndromes, encephalopathies, severe neorcortical epileptic syndromes, benign focal seizures, idiopathic generalized epilepsies, familial focal epilepsies, symptomatic and probably symptomatic focal epilepsies, reflex seizures and reflex epilepsies, and a pharmacopoeia of prophylactic antiepileptic drugs.
He describes focal seizures as occurring when pools of neurons surrounding the focus are sufficiently excited and generalized seizures occurring when the level of cortical excitability has reached a point at which thalamic recruiting volleys generalize and spread.
To the Editor: A 38-year-old, HIV-seropositive Nigerian man sought treatment with an 8-month history of severe parietal headache, impaired memory, fatigue, paresthesia of the left arm, and left-sided focal seizures.
His parents race him to the emergency room where, moments after arrival, he suffers a series of focal seizures involving his left leg, followed within a minute or two by a generalized grand mal seizure.
Focal seizures commonly begin as spasms in the face, hand, or foot and spread to other muscles.
This study is important because even if we cannot identify a cause of focal seizures in children and they do not fit into a known epilepsy syndrome, most of the children outgrow the seizures, and very few have seizures that are unable to be controlled by medication," says Elaine Wirrell, M.

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