fluoride

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fluoride

 [floor´īd]
any binary compound of fluorine.
fluoride poisoning a toxic condition that sometimes occurs with ingestion of excessive fluoride. Acute fluoride poisoning involves an immediate physiological reaction, with nausea, vomiting, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Chronic fluoride poisoning is a physiological reaction to long term exposure to high levels of fluoride and is characterized by dental fluorosis, skeletal fluorosis, and kidney damage. Called also fluorosis.
systemic fluoride a fluoride ingested in water, supplements, or some other form. See also fluoridation.
topical fluoride a fluoride applied directly to the teeth, especially of children, in a dental caries prevention program.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd),
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

[floo͡r′īd]
an anion of fluorine. Fluoride compounds are introduced into drinking water or applied directly to the teeth to prevent tooth decay.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical; the anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

a compound of fluorine that replaces hydroxyl groups in teeth and bones and reduces the tendency to tooth decay. Its therapeutic use was discovered accidentally at Bauxite, Arkansas, when water containing fluoride was replaced by water lacking fluoride, resulting in an increase of dental cavities in children. See FLUORIDATION, DENTAL CARIES.

Fluoride

A chemical compound containing fluorine that is used to treat water or applied directly to teeth to prevent decay.

fluoride,

n a mineral important in bone formation used for the treatment of osteoporosis and prevention of tooth decay. Overdose can produce tooth mottling, joint pain, stomach pain, and nausea.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride(s)

(flŏŏr´īd),
n a salt of hydrofluoric acid, commonly sodium or stannous (tin).
fluoride dietary supplements,
n.pl the orally administered nutritional additives of the chemical fluoride; often taken by individuals without regular access to a fluoridated water supply; available as chewable tablets, drops, pills, and in combination with vitamin supplements. See also fluoride drops.
fluoride drops,
n a supplemental liquid form of the chemical fluoride. They can be administered to children from 6 months to 3 years of age but are not usually recommended because most children are exposed to normal levels of fluoride in their water systems at home and school and in their beverages.
fluoride, stannous,
n a compound of tin and fluorine used in dentifrices to prevent caries.
fluoride tablets/lozenges,
n.pl the supplemental forms of the chemical fluoride. Tablets must be chewed, and lozenges must be held in the oral cavity until dissolved in order to benefit from the fluoride's contact with the teeth.
fluoride toxicity,
n poisoning as a result of ingesting too much fluoride. Symptoms range from upset stomach to death.
fluoride varnish,
n a topical resin containing fluoride that is thinly applied to the tooth surface and used as a preventive treatment for caries. Can also be used as a desensitizing agent to treat dentinal hypersensitivity by temporarily blocking dentinal tubules.
fluorides, topical,
n.pl the salts of hydrofluoric acid (usually sodium or tin salts) that may be applied in solution to the exposed dental surfaces to prevent dental caries and promote remineralization. They can be applied by trays or mouthrinses or by techniques such as paint-on.
fluorides, topical, paint-on technique,
n a professionally administered procedure in which the exposed dental surfaces are coated with a fluoride solution or gel or varnish to prevent caries and promote remineralization.

fluoride

any binary compound of fluorine. See also fluorine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sadly, the harmful effects of fluorides not only just alter the aesthetic appearance of teeth but also affect the other body organs.
In aborted human foetuses collected from endemic fluorosis area, it was found that accumulation of fluorides in brain tissue causes disruption of certain neurotransmitters and receptors in nerve cells and also increased numerical density of volume of nerves and undifferentiated neuroblasts.
How does fluoride act in dental caries preven- tion?
Normally deficiency of fluoride is not experienced if drinks like tea and coffee, sea food, milk, gelatin and vegetables like potatoes and turnips are included in daily diet.
Conclusion: Fluoride that created oxidative stress inhibited lipid peroxidation and apparently increased the antioxidant defence system.
Silver diamine fluoride presents a noninvasive option for caries arrest and treatment when applied directly to dentin caries lesions
KEY WORDS: Beverages, Dental Erosion, Dental Fluorosis, Fluoride, pH.
Group A served as a control group that was not treated with any fluoride intoxication; whereas in group B C and D chicks were injected a weekly dose of NaF 10 20 and 30 g per gram of body weight respectively.
program requires that 80 % of the labeled amount of fluoride must be released by the formulation with one minute of homogenization with a 1:3 dilution with water [4].
The link between the presence of fluoride in public water supplies and a reduction in dental decay was first noticed early last century when researchers discovered that people living in areas where water contained naturally high levels of fluoride suffered less tooth decay than those living in other areas.
Over the past few decades, a substantial decline in dental caries has occurred and the widespread use of fluoride has been postulated as the major reason for decline in dental caries (Selwitz et al.
11) But it was only in the last century that effective therapeutics, mainly fluoride, were incorporated into their formula, resulting in significant improvements to the oral health of populations worldwide.