fluoride

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Related to Flouride: fluoride toothpaste, Fluoride poisoning

fluoride

 [floor´īd]
any binary compound of fluorine.
fluoride poisoning a toxic condition that sometimes occurs with ingestion of excessive fluoride. Acute fluoride poisoning involves an immediate physiological reaction, with nausea, vomiting, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Chronic fluoride poisoning is a physiological reaction to long term exposure to high levels of fluoride and is characterized by dental fluorosis, skeletal fluorosis, and kidney damage. Called also fluorosis.
systemic fluoride a fluoride ingested in water, supplements, or some other form. See also fluoridation.
topical fluoride a fluoride applied directly to the teeth, especially of children, in a dental caries prevention program.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd),
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

[floo͡r′īd]
an anion of fluorine. Fluoride compounds are introduced into drinking water or applied directly to the teeth to prevent tooth decay.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical; the anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

a compound of fluorine that replaces hydroxyl groups in teeth and bones and reduces the tendency to tooth decay. Its therapeutic use was discovered accidentally at Bauxite, Arkansas, when water containing fluoride was replaced by water lacking fluoride, resulting in an increase of dental cavities in children. See FLUORIDATION, DENTAL CARIES.

Fluoride

A chemical compound containing fluorine that is used to treat water or applied directly to teeth to prevent decay.

fluoride,

n a mineral important in bone formation used for the treatment of osteoporosis and prevention of tooth decay. Overdose can produce tooth mottling, joint pain, stomach pain, and nausea.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride(s)

(flŏŏr´īd),
n a salt of hydrofluoric acid, commonly sodium or stannous (tin).
fluoride dietary supplements,
n.pl the orally administered nutritional additives of the chemical fluoride; often taken by individuals without regular access to a fluoridated water supply; available as chewable tablets, drops, pills, and in combination with vitamin supplements. See also fluoride drops.
fluoride drops,
n a supplemental liquid form of the chemical fluoride. They can be administered to children from 6 months to 3 years of age but are not usually recommended because most children are exposed to normal levels of fluoride in their water systems at home and school and in their beverages.
fluoride, stannous,
n a compound of tin and fluorine used in dentifrices to prevent caries.
fluoride tablets/lozenges,
n.pl the supplemental forms of the chemical fluoride. Tablets must be chewed, and lozenges must be held in the oral cavity until dissolved in order to benefit from the fluoride's contact with the teeth.
fluoride toxicity,
n poisoning as a result of ingesting too much fluoride. Symptoms range from upset stomach to death.
fluoride varnish,
n a topical resin containing fluoride that is thinly applied to the tooth surface and used as a preventive treatment for caries. Can also be used as a desensitizing agent to treat dentinal hypersensitivity by temporarily blocking dentinal tubules.
fluorides, topical,
n.pl the salts of hydrofluoric acid (usually sodium or tin salts) that may be applied in solution to the exposed dental surfaces to prevent dental caries and promote remineralization. They can be applied by trays or mouthrinses or by techniques such as paint-on.
fluorides, topical, paint-on technique,
n a professionally administered procedure in which the exposed dental surfaces are coated with a fluoride solution or gel or varnish to prevent caries and promote remineralization.

fluoride

any binary compound of fluorine. See also fluorine.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) It is now known the beneficial effects of systemic fluoride are minor, and topical applications have greater benefit, including flouride that has been systemically absorbed and is then excreted in saliva.
Dental milk, which has flouride added, is now being drunk by 4,568children,out of a population of 25,000 people under- 18 living in Knowsley.
Compounds in tea, including flouride, phytoestrogens, and flavonoids may be responsible for the health benefits of tea, resulting in high marks for the humble brew--giving you a good reason to trade off some of those lattes for tea.
We have a very high-risk population and have found that [Enamelon] does protect as compared to a flouride mouth rinse," says Athena S.
Hedman said the company is offering an alternative to sulfuryl flouride, a commonly used fumigant.
At a speech on May 21 to the Commonwealth Club in San Fransisco [sic], [Dan Quayle] blamed much [sic] of the country's problems on a `legal aristocracy' that, he said, has undermined parental authority, school discipline, and religious freedom; caused global warming; put flouride [sic] in the water; and is behind violent Hollywood movies and most of bad things you can think of.
Anti-fluoride campaigners point to American research which, they claim, shows that flouride is dangerous.
In a field study, Damkaer and Dey[10] (See sidebar, Flouride Effects on Salmon at John Day Dam, Columbia River, 1982-1986) demonstrated that high salmon loss at John Day Dam on the Columbia River, 1982-1986, was caused by the inhibition of migration by fluoride contamination from an aluminum smelter located 1.
Police said they confiscated eight hydrogen flouride tanks and four oxygen tanks May 14 in a mountain area in Nikko, Tochigi Prefecture, northwest of Tokyo.
In addition to brushing your teeth at least twice a day and watching the number and type of snacks that you eat, make sure that your water contains the right amount of flouride and that you see your dentist twice a year.
Figure 3 shows the loss of strontium against degassing time when cover flux (mainly containing potassium chloride, sodium chloride and flouride salts) was added.
Those most at risk should have semiannual flouride treatments by their dentists, who can apply a flouride gel or the newer flouride varnish, Duraflour, each of which provides maximum concentrations of flouride.