fluorescence

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fluorescence

 [floo͡-res´ens]
the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.
fluorescence microscopy the use of a fluorescence microscope to identify microorganisms or specific tissue constituents that have been stained with a fluorochrome or a fluorochrome-labeled substance (such as an antibody to a tissue antigen). A fluorescent antibody test can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria. See also immunofluorescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ents),
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence, in which emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed. See: photoelectric effect.
[fluorspar + -escence, inchoative suffix]

fluorescence

/flu·o·res·cence/ (-ens) the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.fluores´cent

fluorescence

(flo͝o-rĕs′əns, flô-, flō-)
n.
1. The emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially of visible light, stimulated in a substance by the absorption of incident radiation and persisting only as long as the stimulating radiation is continued.
2. The property of emitting such radiation.
3. The radiation so emitted.

fluorescence

[floo͡res′əns]
Etymology: L, flux, a discharge
the emission of light of one wavelength by a substance when it is exposed to electromagnetic radiation of a shorter wavelength. Fluorescent substances that emit visible light appear luminous. fluoresce, v.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence in that, in the latter, emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]

fluorescence

Emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially coloured visible light, during the period of absorption of radiation, which is often of a different frequency from the emitted radiation. Some substances, for instance, fluoresce visibly under ambient invisible ultraviolet light.

fluorescence

the property of giving out light when molecules are excited by incident light. Emitted light is always of a shorter wavelength than the incident light.

fluorescence,

n the emission of light of a particular wavelength by a substance upon absorption of ele-ctromagnetic radiation of a shorter wavelength.

fluorescence

Property of a substance that, when illuminated absorbs light of a given wavelength and re-emits it as radiations of a longer wavelength. Example: fluorescein. See Draper's law; Wood's light; lumi-nescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance due to absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as stimulus present.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]

fluorescence (fləres´əns),

n the emission of radiation of a particular wavelength by certain substances as the result of absorption of radiation of a shorter wavelength.

fluorescence

the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.

fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS)
an instrument for analysis (FACscan) and separating mixed populations of cells after labeling individual cell-specific surface antigens with fluorescent antibody. The individual cells in droplets are passed through a laser beam; the droplet is deflected into one of two or more collection vessels depending upon which fluorescent antibody is bound to its surface. Two or more different fluorescent antibodies are used.
fluorescence microscopy
the use of techniques for conjugating antibodies with fluorescent dyes in order to identify specific microorganisms or tissue constituents using a fluorescence microscope. Fluorescent antibody (FA) techniques can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria and viruses. There are two major types of FA techniques, direct and indirect, both of which are based on the antigen-antibody reaction in which the antibody attaches itself to its specific antigen.
In the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) method, the antibody is bound to the antigen, for example, a bacterial cell in a smear, and cannot be easily removed by elution (washing). The antibody remains attached to the cell after all other serum proteins have been washed away. Since the antibody has been rendered fluorescent by conjugation with fluorescein or another dye, the outline of the bacterial cell that it coats can readily be seen with a special microscope.
In the indirect method (IFA), the specific antibody is allowed to react with the antigen. The slide is then washed and treated with a labeled antibody to the specific antibody. For example, if the specific antibody was raised in a rabbit, it is then treated with fluorescein-labeled anti-rabbit globulin, which results in a combination of this labeled antibody with the rabbit immunoglobulin already attached to the antigen.
Fluorescent antibody studies have been used in the detection of numerous bacterial, viral, fungal and protozoan infections and in the identification and localization of many tissue antigens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Daniltchenko DI, Riedl CR, Sachs MD, Koenig F, Daha KL, pfleug H et al: Long term benefit of 5-aminolevulinic acid flourescence assisted transurethral resection of superficial bladder cancer: 5-year results of of a prospective randomized study.
Rapid prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal aneuploidies by flourescence in situ hybridization: clinical experience with 4500 specimens.
Instruments include: the PCI Photon Counting Spectrofluorometer, the K2 Multifrequency Phase Fluorometer, ALBA a microscope based flourescence correlation spectrometer.
An integrated, multipurpose LED drive module connects to the model via a 10-pin connector for convenient flourescence measurements.
The book's first chapter, "The Coming of Media Entertainment," by Dolf Zillmann of the University of Alabama, begins by tracing the media-entertainment phenomenon, from the early humanoids, to Homo erectus, to Ancient Egyptian culture, to the Roman Empire, to Christianity's birth and influences, to the entertainment arts flourescence in the mid-1900s, when theater, opera, concerts, sports, recreation, games, and reading for pleasure were frequently enjoyed.
Once avidin binds the quencher, it would no longer get close enough to the polymer to dim flourescence, they predicted.
The current size (a four-inch cube) is smaller than many applications require, and the upconversion flourescence efficiencies of the image chamber materials are low.
Many additives increase the intensity of Luminate flourescence, and change the color of the emission, shortening the visible lifetime of the emission.
Scenes were played in a landscape of flourescence, evoking the ward, the mortuary, the offices of an evil-but-unnamed bureaucracy.
Additional crosses were made to confirm compatibility using flourescence microscopy.
This manual looks at applications in the light of this new technology which employs natural primary flourescence as well as specially designed fluorchromes in fluoro meters, image analyzers and microscopes.
Capabilites include cross-sectional analysis, real-time x-ray imaging, x-ray flourescence, optical and laser microscopy, and thermal analysis.