fluoride

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Related to Floride: fluoride, Fluoride poisoning

fluoride

 [floor´īd]
any binary compound of fluorine.
fluoride poisoning a toxic condition that sometimes occurs with ingestion of excessive fluoride. Acute fluoride poisoning involves an immediate physiological reaction, with nausea, vomiting, hypersalivation, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Chronic fluoride poisoning is a physiological reaction to long term exposure to high levels of fluoride and is characterized by dental fluorosis, skeletal fluorosis, and kidney damage. Called also fluorosis.
systemic fluoride a fluoride ingested in water, supplements, or some other form. See also fluoridation.
topical fluoride a fluoride applied directly to the teeth, especially of children, in a dental caries prevention program.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd),
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

[floo͡r′īd]
an anion of fluorine. Fluoride compounds are introduced into drinking water or applied directly to the teeth to prevent tooth decay.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical; the anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride

a compound of fluorine that replaces hydroxyl groups in teeth and bones and reduces the tendency to tooth decay. Its therapeutic use was discovered accidentally at Bauxite, Arkansas, when water containing fluoride was replaced by water lacking fluoride, resulting in an increase of dental cavities in children. See FLUORIDATION, DENTAL CARIES.

Fluoride

A chemical compound containing fluorine that is used to treat water or applied directly to teeth to prevent decay.

fluoride,

n a mineral important in bone formation used for the treatment of osteoporosis and prevention of tooth decay. Overdose can produce tooth mottling, joint pain, stomach pain, and nausea.

fluor·ide

(flōr'īd)
1. A compound of fluorine with a metal, a nonmetal, or an organic radical.
2. The anion of fluorine; inhibits enolase; found in bone and tooth apatite; fluoride has a cariostatic effect; high levels are toxic.

fluoride(s)

(flŏŏr´īd),
n a salt of hydrofluoric acid, commonly sodium or stannous (tin).
fluoride dietary supplements,
n.pl the orally administered nutritional additives of the chemical fluoride; often taken by individuals without regular access to a fluoridated water supply; available as chewable tablets, drops, pills, and in combination with vitamin supplements. See also fluoride drops.
fluoride drops,
n a supplemental liquid form of the chemical fluoride. They can be administered to children from 6 months to 3 years of age but are not usually recommended because most children are exposed to normal levels of fluoride in their water systems at home and school and in their beverages.
fluoride, stannous,
n a compound of tin and fluorine used in dentifrices to prevent caries.
fluoride tablets/lozenges,
n.pl the supplemental forms of the chemical fluoride. Tablets must be chewed, and lozenges must be held in the oral cavity until dissolved in order to benefit from the fluoride's contact with the teeth.
fluoride toxicity,
n poisoning as a result of ingesting too much fluoride. Symptoms range from upset stomach to death.
fluoride varnish,
n a topical resin containing fluoride that is thinly applied to the tooth surface and used as a preventive treatment for caries. Can also be used as a desensitizing agent to treat dentinal hypersensitivity by temporarily blocking dentinal tubules.
fluorides, topical,
n.pl the salts of hydrofluoric acid (usually sodium or tin salts) that may be applied in solution to the exposed dental surfaces to prevent dental caries and promote remineralization. They can be applied by trays or mouthrinses or by techniques such as paint-on.
fluorides, topical, paint-on technique,
n a professionally administered procedure in which the exposed dental surfaces are coated with a fluoride solution or gel or varnish to prevent caries and promote remineralization.

fluoride

any binary compound of fluorine. See also fluorine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Les autorites tiennent cependant a preciser que la Floride n'est pas aussi violente que le reste des Etats du pays.
Although I have to confess I don't remember the sixties' Renault Floride, the modern Megane take on it certainly captures the spirit of the era.
The Floride is the sort of car one might take one look at and decide to buy there and then on sheer impulse.
Les principaux textes de Parkman ont paru en francais sous les titres suivants : Les pionniers francais dans l'Amerique du Nord: Floride, Canada; et Les Jesuites dans l'Amerique du Nord au XVIIIeme siecle.
Nous avons observe que la proportion de l'emploi au niveau des comtes dans le noyau super-creatif de Floride a un effet positif sur les salaries moyens.
Cet article decrit un nouveau modele de plaidoyer pour les droits genesiques applique des 2003 en Caroline du Sud et Floride.
Kong Le Jourdain TE[umlaut]moignages recueillis par David <p>Pour Zoulfa, E[umlaut]tudiante de 22 ans, A1/2-2007 commence bien car je vais partir faire un stage de design en Floride.
imposing substantial monetary sanctions against them (in excess of $400,000), jointly and severally, (9) under [section] 1927 for their conduct in representing Floride Norelus, a Haitian immigrant, in a Title VII sexual harassment lawsuit.
The first is retold in Heptameron story 10, in which the young Floride stands for Marguerite, attracted to her brother's dashing friend, and cruelly deceived when he tries to force himself on her.
La Cour y a reconnu le caractere executoire d'un jugement de la Floride obtenu par defaut contre des residents ontariens qui les avait condamnes a des dommages tres eleves a la suite d'une transaction immobiliere d'une valeur modeste en examinant (avec une bienveillance sans doute inspiree par la courtoisie) le deroulement des procedures devant le tribunal etranger.
This novella, which is by far the longest of the collection, making it in the words of Marcel Tetel "un microcosme de l'oeuvre entiere" (564), tells the tragic story of Floride and Amadour.
14) Chapter four compares how French territory and the changing relationships between crown and aristocracy are represented in both Marguerite de Navarre's story of Floride and Amadour in the Heptameron and Madame de Lafayette's La Princesse de Cleves.

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