senna

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senna

 [sen´ah]
the dried leaflets of Cassia acutiflora; used in a syrup, fluid extract, or compound powder as a cathartic.

sen·na

(sen'ă),
The dried leaflets or legumes of Cassia acutifolia (Alexandrine senna) and C. angustifolia (Tinnevelly or Indian senna); a laxative.
[Ar. senā]

senna

/sen·na/ (sen´ah) the dried leaflets of Cassia acutifolia or C. angustifolia; used chiefly as a cathartic.

senna

(sĕn′ə)
n.
1. Any of various plants in the pea family, chiefly of the genera Senna and Chamaecrista, having pinnately compound leaves and showy, nearly regular, usually yellow flowers, used as ornamentals and for medicinal purposes.
2. A preparation of the dried leaves of Senna alexandrina, used as a laxative.

senna

an herbal product taken from several Cassia species found across the world.
use It is used as a laxative.
contraindications It should not be used during pregnancy and lactation, in children less than 12 years of age (unless prescribed by physician), or in those with known hypersensitivity to this product. Senna is also prohibited in those with intestinal obstruction, ulcerative colitis, GI bleeding, appendicitis, acute surgical abdomen, nausea, vomiting, or congestive heart failure.

senna

Herbal medicine
A shrub native to northern and eastern Africa, which contains emodin and anthraquinone glycosides (sennosides A and B); it is primarily used as a laxative.
 
Toxicity
In excess, senna may evoke nausea, vomiting and colic; it should not be used in pregnancy or in those who are nursing, or who have colitis, haemorrhoids or ulcers. Overuse may be associated with so-called lazy bowel syndrome.

senna

A stimulant laxative drug used to treat constipation. The drug is on the WHO official list. A brand name is Senokot.

senna (seˑ·n),

n Latin name:
Senna alexandrina, Cassia spp.; part used: leaves; uses: presurgery laxative, acute constipation; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, intestinal obstruction, ulcerative colitis, nausea, vomiting, congestive heart failure; do not use longer than 7 to 14 days without consulting a doctor; cardiac glycosides, other laxatives. Also called
Alexandrian senna, black draught, Dr. Calwell dosalax, Fletcher's Castoria, Gentlax, Khartoum senna, or
tinnevelly senna.

Senna

plant genus in the legume family Caesalpiniaceae; contain anthraquinone glycosides which cause diarrhea; an unidentified toxin causes muscle necrosis. Includes S. floribunda, S. obtusifolia, S. occidentale, S. roemeriana. All also called Cassia spp., e.g. C. floribunda.

senna

the dried leaflets of Cassia acutiflora; used in a syrup, fluid extract or compound powder as a cathartic.

senna bean
see cassiaoccidentalis.
coffee senna
see cassiaoccidentalis.
References in periodicals archive ?
He hailed Fletcher's leadership and noted the last three years had seen significant change at the GCSB and the statutory review of the intelligence agencies will usher in a further period of change.
Starting and running so many diverse businesses has resulted in a variety of awards and recognitions over Fletcher's business career.
Unfortunately, you had to ask to find this out; though part of Fletcher's program of tailoring his work to a specific site and subject, this particular series, in its reliance on O'Dell, who is, after all, a community of exactly one, comes across as hermetic.
Due to the limited repertoire of music available to the classical guitarist, Fletcher's approach enables him to broaden the scope of music available for the instrument.
Thus, like the maps of the New World in the period with which he is concerned, Anthony Fletcher's map of gender between 1500 and 1800 has serious flaws.
Similarly, Fletcher's sense that the eighteenth century began to leave the Western tradition of misogyny behind seems to result from a narrowing of sources from the early section of his book, which included ballads, drama, and proverbs as well as conduct literature.
Fletcher's own drawings (most of which are used in this edition) are exemplary and were made for what he called 'A history of architecture on the Comparative Method'.
John Gould Fletcher and Southern Modernism is divided into four solid chapters: the first, an overview of the major stages of Fletcher's career from 1915 to 1925 and the next three, detailed chronological discussions of his individual volumes of poetry, particularly as they reflect Southern tendencies.
Fletcher's death until later, either through a letter from home or in reading the Westborough Chronotype, a local newspaper delivered to every soldier from the town during the war.
From that point forward, Fletcher is relentlessly pursued by the cub's raging mother, a 10-foot-tall, 1,200-pound fury who has paws that are as wide as Fletcher's chest, 5-inch claws and a grotesque scar across her face.
But, like the small, haunting portraits and still lifes he's been making over the p ast few years in his deliberately unrenovated North London Studio, Fletcher's landscapes don't seem fixed in any particular time.
Ridge set Fletcher's execution for Thursday, May 3, 2001.