flavonoid

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flavonoid

/fla·vo·noid/ (fla´vah-noid) any of a group of compounds containing a characteristic aromatic nucleus and widely distributed in higher plants, often as a pigment; a subgroup with biological activity in mammals is the bioflavonoids.

flavonoid

Herbal medicine
Any of a family of yellow pigments which are chemically similar to tannins and somewhat similar in use; flavonoids have been used for bruising, hay fever and menorrhagia. 

Nutrition
A family of biologically active polyphenolic compounds found in fruits (in particular in the pulp thereof), vegetables, tea and red wine, which are potent antioxidants and effective platelet inhibitors; a flavonoid-rich diet may protect against atherosclerosis and platelet-mediated thrombosis, due to flavonoids’ platelet-inhibition.

flavonoid

Bioflavonoid Nutrition Any biologically-active polyphenol found in fruits, especially in the pulp, vegetables, tea, red wine, which are potent antioxidants and platelet inhibitors

fla·vo·noid

(flāvō-noyd)
Metabolite from plant matter.

Flavonoid

A food chemical that helps to limit oxidative damage to the body's cells, and protects against heart disease and cancer.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Emerging research also suggests that the flavinoids in cocoa and chocolate help keep the heart healthy.
Flavinoids appear to alter properties of fat in the bloodstream, making them less likely to initiate heart attacks.
The flavinoids present in soya have been shown to increase oestrogen levels when they are too low and reduce them when they are too high which is why they help to reduce hot flushes which are thought to be due to a lack of oestrogen.
The chemicals are antioxidant flavinoids and, surprise surprise, seaweed has got them as well.
The study adds to a growing body of evidence that suggests chocolate, and dark chocolate in particular, is the latest superfood, thanks to high levels of anti-oxidants and health-boosting compounds called flavinoids.
According to a report by leading diet and health experts, chemicals in tea called flavinoids have a mild but beneficial effect in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure.
One of the first significant findings was the discovery of flavinoids and antioxidants in tea, and those are thought to do at least two main things.
Red wine is said to contain anti- oxidants - called flavinoids - from grape skins.