flashback

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flash·back

(flash'bak),
1. An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion occurring some time after ingestion of the hallucinogen that produced the original effect and without subsequent ingestion of the substance.
2. In posttraumatic stress disorder (q.v.), the sensations resulting from strong emotional sequences acting as triggers.

flashback

(flăsh′băk′)
n.
a. Psychiatry A recurring, intensely vivid mental image of a past traumatic experience: soldiers who had flashbacks of the war.
b. An unexpected recurrence of the effects of a hallucinogenic drug long after its original use.
c. A vivid memory that arises spontaneously or is provoked by an experience.
d. An experience that has characteristics of an earlier experience.

flashback

a phenomenon experienced by persons who have taken a hallucinogenic drug or had psychological trauma and unexpectedly reexperience its effects. This is also suffered by patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.
Psychiatry A non-drug-related recurrent recollection of a traumatic event, frightening experience or image, as may affect ex-soldiers, e.g., Vietnam veterans; the recurrence of a past memory, feeling, or perception
Substance abuse An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion often with negative overtones and accompanied by fear and anxiety; flashbacks are an adverse effect classically associated with psychedelic drugs—e.g., LSD and PCP—which occur days to weeks after the last dose; flashbacks are common in heavy users and disappear with time

flashback

Psychology A non-drug-related repetition of frightening experiences or images, which may affect ex-soldiers, as is well-described in veterans of the Vietnam conflict Substance abuse Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder an involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion often with negative overtones and accompanied by fear and anxiety; flashbacks are an adverse effect classically associated with psychedelic drugs–eg, LSD and PCP, which occur days to wks after the last dose; flashbacks are common in heavy users and disappear with time. See LSD, PCP.
Flashback-hallucinogen persisting perception disorder
A The re-experiencing, after discontinuating use of a hallucinogen, of 1+ perceptual symptoms experienced while intoxicated with the hallucinogen, eg geometric hallucinations, flashes of colors, macropsia, micropsia, etc
B Symptoms in A cause significant distress or impairment of social, occupational, or other important function
C Symptoms are not due to a general medical condition, or otherwise accounted for by another mental disorder
*DSM-IV American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC 1994

flash·back

(flash'bak)
An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion occurring some time after ingestion of the hallucinogen that produced the original effect and without subsequent ingestion of the substance.

Flashback

The re-emergence of a traumatic memory as a vivid recollection of sounds, images, and sensations associated with the trauma. The person having the flashback typically feels as if they are reliving the event. Flashbacks were first described by doctors treating combat veterans of World War I (1914–1918).
Mentioned in: Stockholm Syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
He said the flashbacks he suffers from vary from giving CPR to a severely injured soldier to seeing his colleagues drive over a bomb.
In those that have drunk seven or more units of alcohol both types of memory are disrupted leading to fewer flashbacks and an overall reduction in memory for the event.
Witt Flashback arrestors can be mounted in any position or orientation with one flashback arrestor connected to protect each individual piece of equipment.
In this study, the negative memories were disrupted by Tetris, which reduced the likelihood that those memories returned through disturbing and involuntary flashbacks.
5 for exposed-only subjects, 2 for those who experienced only flashbacks, 3 for those who expressed wider symptoms, and 4 for those with PTSD.
Subjects confronted with at least one traumatic event who had experienced flashback symptoms.
She is a survivor of child abuse, rape, hate crimes, a dysfunctional family that moved more than 79 times before she was 16 years old and discrimination in the workplace, and Flashback Artist is the story of that survival.
And it's not just the fact the dad is alive in these scenes that tells us they're flashbacks - Sally Field has been given a very different haircut.
Nicholas Gareth-Jones, prosecuting, said to the jury: 'Mr Mears says he doesn't remember what happened yet he insists he didn't assault this woman on the basis of not having any flashbacks.
What is the cause of these terrible statistics, and how can Vietnam veterans cope with flashbacks, depression, fits of rage and worse?
The breakdown of their mental capacities has left them vulnerable to time disorientation and traumatic flashbacks.
Using flashbacks projected on to a 10-ft screen, audiences are kept guessing as to which man is contemplating which course of action.