flagellant

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flagellant

[flaj′ələnt]
a person who receives sexual gratification from the practice of flagellation.
A person who willingly subjects himself to whipping or scourging, as a religious penitent, or as a sexual masochist

flagellant

(flăj′ĕ-lănt) [L. flagellum, whip]
1. Pert. to a flagellum.
2. Pert. to stroking in massage.
3. One who practices flagellation.

flagellant

A person who whips himself, or who is whipped by another, especially for purposes of sexual arousal and gratification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dorothea's (similarly to Margery's) life re-captures processional character of medieval culture in which flagellants, kings, queens and convicts were all united under the holy aim of pilgrimage.
2 29 attacks some flagellants, one of whom hits him with a 7.
asserted that "it has been rightly said that even Klaus Fuchs, the Rosenburgs and others who betrayed the atomic secrets of Los Alamos would have been afraid to tamper with the soul-shattering secrets of the black-hooded, naked flagellants who enact a sacrament of torture, agony and death each Easter and then soak the New Mexico soil with the blood of their `Christ'" (Lefebure quoted in Weigle 1976: 109).
These include: the nationalist social critic Georges Deherme and his Les Classes moyennes: etude sur le parasitisme social of 1912; the lawyer Adolphe Thery and his Manuel pratique de la lutte antipornographique of 1927; the Hungarian doctor a nd journalist Max Nordau whose important work Degeneration was translated and went through seven editions in 1894; Armand Dubarry's Les Flagellants of 1898; Marcello Fabri's 1921 novel L'Inconnu sur les villes which figures the War as a female vampire draining male bodies of their virility; the homophobic novelist Michel Ducoglay's Chez les mauvais garcons and Sous le col bleu of 1938; Charles-Etienne's Notre-Dame de Lesbos of 1919; Colette's Le Pur et l'impur of 1932; also on lesbianism, the numerous essays on Renee Vivien (who died in 1909).
While this probably didn't make her Wimple of the Month with the 5am flagellants, Teresa did set out, with her friend St John of the Cross, to establish convents and monasteries throughout Spain and to write mystical, almost erotic tracts on Christian love.
Polite's The Flagellants and Sister X and the Victims of Foul Play, and Louise Meriwether's Daddy Was a Number Runner, although it would have been even more convincing if she had included readings of these forgotten novels along with her examination of more canonical literature.
Behind him, serving him, stand some really scary guys, like Cardinal Ratzinger, Cardinal O'Connor and the embarrassing William Donohue, men whose theology I recognize from my days as a medieval studies major, and from my childhood in the Deep South: flagellants, fanatics, fundamentalists and cynical political strategists whose utter lack of genuine spiritual inspiration and imagination, not to mention simple human compassion, is cloaked in inept, selective, antiquated misreadings of the Scriptures.
Allow, Therefore, that in the planetary scene Your disaffected flagellants, well-stuffed, Smacking their muzzy bellies in parade, Proud of such novelties of the sublime, Such tink and tank and tunk-a-tunk-tunk, May, merely may, madame, whip from themselves A jovial hullabaloo among the spheres.
Modern-day urban flagellants may carp, as one did recently, that this work is the story of the "winners" and not the "losers.
This gives rise to a new, rather atavistic religious feeling and to the rise of new sects, public confessions, preachers of penitence, processions of flagellants, et cetera.
Dubey offers brief discussions of Ann Allen Shockley's Loving Her and Carlene Polite's The Flagellants, among others, and observes that the concerns of black women novelists in the 1970s are developed in the 1980s in novels such as Sherley Anne Williams's Dessa Rose, Toni Morrison's Beloved, and Gloria Naylor's Mama Day.