flagellant

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flagellant

[flaj′ələnt]
a person who receives sexual gratification from the practice of flagellation.
A person who willingly subjects himself to whipping or scourging, as a religious penitent, or as a sexual masochist

flagellant

(flăj′ĕ-lănt) [L. flagellum, whip]
1. Pert. to a flagellum.
2. Pert. to stroking in massage.
3. One who practices flagellation.

flagellant

A person who whips himself, or who is whipped by another, especially for purposes of sexual arousal and gratification.
References in periodicals archive ?
As an outsider (though he speaks Farsi and has studied Persian culture at Cambridge) and an unbeliever, de Bellaigue views the flagellants skeptically.
There were flagellants, who used to think that their route to salvation would be through whipping themselves.
Discipline du corps et de l'esprit chez les flagellants au moyen age.
In the 1260s, a first wave of foundations of devotional confraternities took place -- the flagellant confraternities or confraternities of discipline.
the battenti or flagellants of Basilicata), and blood-related miracles (e.
This perpetuum mobile of the tongue regales the reader with remarks on such varied subjects as the origin of place-names, the Flagellants, good and bad teeth, desirable and undesirable customers, the Italian art mafia, the "Villach smile" on paintings, culinary culture, the peasants' liberator Hans Kudlich, problems of traffic and tourism, Carinthian customs, the practices of breweries, elderly peasant women relieving themselves alfresco, the importance of the University of Innsbruck's Abortgrubenforschung, saints and sinners, martyrs and militiamen.
The whips used by the flagellants must be clean and well-maintained," Duque said.
The death obsession of the flagellants was deemed holy, and the blood lust of the crusaders was sanctified.
From the 13th through the 15th centuries, penitent flagellants waged spiritual war "not only on Antichrist but also on the established order and the social, clerical and money powers that were part of the anarchy that masqueraded as order.
Less acquisitive than the laudesi, the flagellants did not become entangled in the finances of commemoration, though they also provided vital funeral services to their members.
Yet, a review of the official record speaks about a penitente community comprised of "blood-curdling" flagellants that chose to crucify people during Holy week in the Christian calendar.
Italians of all social strata were suddenly inspired to don the white penitential robes of flagellants (thus, bianchi), confess, take up the cross, and pledge themselves to nine days of fasting and processions which, in their extra- as well as intra-urban circuits, conveyed the movement from Liguria down to Rome.