Fitzpatrick skin type

Fitzpatrick skin type

(fits-pa′trik)
[T. B. Fitzpatrick, U.S. Dermatologist, 1919–2003]
A classification system for determining how reactive a person's skin is to ultraviolet light. The system divides people into six phototypes, numbered I to VI. Type I skin type is the fairest, most freckled, and most susceptible to photodamage or damage by laser treatments. Type VI is the darkest skin type and the most resistant to sunburn and photodamage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tatt2Away can treat all coloured tattoos but it can't treat patients who are a Fitzpatrick skin Type 3 or above, as these skin types are often more prone to hypo-pigmentation.
3], we calculated the amounts produced from everyday outdoor UV dose estimates (Godar 2001) according to sex, age, Fitzpatrick skin type (Fitzpatrick 1988), clothing (Matsuoka ct al.
from Copenhagen conducted a randomized, double-blind trial in 20 healthy volunteers (age range, 23 to 62 years) with Fitzpatrick skin type I to III to evaluate the effect of topical corticosteroids in treating acute sunburn.
To study this, 3-mm full-thickness punch biopsies of skin were collected from sun-protected and sun-exposed sites from 16 healthy women aged 25-73 of Fitzpatrick skin type I and II.
A 38-year-old woman with Fitzpatrick skin type I presented to our contact dermatitis clinic with a 10-year history of painful ulcerations on her tongue.
The rate approached 25% among white women from London, significantly higher than the rate among white women from other parts of the world, even after controlling for Fitzpatrick skin type.
All patients were Caucasian with Fitzpatrick skin type I (31 percent), II (35 percent), III (27 percent) or IV (27 percent).
Additionally, 26 percent of subjects treated had Fitzpatrick skin type of V or VI, which is one of the largest percentages of darker skin types enrolled in any FDA filler study.
Most of the patients had a Fitzpatrick skin type II or III, and all but one patient was white.
Risk factors for PIH include Fitzpatrick skin type III-VI; reactions to cosmetic and other products; and inflammatory diseases, such as acne, psoriasis, and eczema.
Subjects were required to have a Norwood Hamilton classification of IIa to V based on the Male Classification System of Hair Loss, and have Fitzpatrick Skin Type Scale I through IV.