fission product

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fis·sion prod·uct

an atomic species produced in the course of the fission of a larger atom such as 235U.

fis·sion prod·uct

(fish'ŭn prod'ŭkt)
An atomic species produced in the course of the fission of a larger atom such as 235U.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional protection could be obtained using a variant of the UREX+ process that mixed certain radioactive fission products in with the plutonium and the minor actinides.
These materials account for much of the risk posed by the waste after the first several hundred years, by which time most of the fission product inventory will have decayed to harmless levels.
The technical feasibility of plutonium recovery will indeed increase with time as the fission product radiation barrier decays away.
Such recycling would require the development of simple, inexpensive means for fission product decontamination of the fuel that does not produce any separated fissile material.
2] grain boundary oxidation, on the effect of fission products on fuel oxidation, on the segregation of rare-earth elements in U[O.
The main applications foreseen are: measurement of solid-gas and gas-gas equilibrium of inorganic compounds possibly containing actinides and radioactive isotopes, measurement of ionisation efficiency curves of inorganic compounds possibly containing actinides and radioactive isotopes, kinetic and quantitative release behaviour of isotopes contained in irradiated nuclear fuel (He, fission gases, condensable fission products and actinides).
During nuclear fission, plutonium and uranium generate many lighter fission products, such as xenon isotopes.
Computer simulations of a nuclear reactor in the Earth's core, conducted at the prestigious Oak Ridge National Laboratory, reveal evidence, in the form of helium fission products, which indicates that the end of the georeactor lifetime may be approaching.
Aerosols that form when fission products vaporize will, as they decay, deposit heat onto whatever they've become attached to.
Called nonvolatile fission products, they do not vaporize except at extremely high temperatures.