Mastophora

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Mastophora

An orb-spinning spider, popularly known as bolas spider for the manner in which it catches its prey, projecting a sticky bola-like mass of silk at the target moth or other flying insect.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is known as a fishing spider because it has hairs on its legs that allow it to glide across the water's surface to grab prey.
Sexual cannibalism in the fishing spider and a model for the evolution of sexual cannibalism based on genetic constraints.
Prey use of the fishing spider Dolomedes triton (Pisauridae, Araneae): an important predator of a community.
Age-related changes in movement patterns in the fishing spider, Dolomedes triton (Araneae, Pisauridae).
It is hoped that the information gleaned so far and any future work will help safeguard this rare and fascinating fishing spider.
Bonnet (1930) reported that the fishing spider Dolomedes fimbriatus (Pisauridae) forcibly cast its excreta out from as far as 3-4 cm from its body.
Chad Johnson, now at the University of California, Davis, is trying to sort out the evolutionary pressures driving sexual cannibalism--the eating of one's mate--in a North American fishing spider, Dolomedes triton.
The fishing spider (Dolomedes triton), which Johnson and Sih study, raises a question, all right.
Courtship behavior and sexual cannibalism in the semi-aquatic fishing spider Dolomedes fimbriatus (Clerck) (Araneae: Pisauridae).
Studies of fishing spiders led them to their basic conclusion: Nobody benefits.
Sexual cannibalism in fishing spiders (Dolomedes triton): an evaluation of two explanations for female aggression towards potential mates.
Among fishing spiders, Johnson and his colleagues linked a female tendency to cannibalize suitors before mating to extra ferocity in hunting.