swarm

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swarm

  1. a group of social insects, especially bees led by a queen, that has left the parent hive in order to start a new colony
  2. a large mass of small animals, especially insects.
  3. ability of certain MICROORGANISMS to move in a collective and ordered manner across a surface. For example, colonies of Proteus swarm in a series of concentric rings across an AGAR plate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Li, A new optimization algorithm: artificial fish school algorithm, Hangzhou, Zhejing University, 2003.
This work uses an IoM model named Fish Schools that simulates the movement of fish species by applying simple rules to each fish in a big group of it.
Given that significant concentrations of biomass occurred in this small portion of the Lancaster Sound region, we concluded that, in theory, sufficient biomass was sequestered in fish schools within the region to support energy flows through the food web.
For this reason, Sepuka advised Fish School attendees against its use.
An individual-based model of fish school reactions: predicting antipredator behaviour as observed in nature.
Susie Salmon has to turn in a report tomorrow at her fish school.
Eitel is Dean of the Roy Fish School of Evangelism and Missions, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, Fort Worth, Texas.
Tandem rigs can bring double trouble with two fish on at a time where these fish school up.
In a test off the coast of New Jersey, the new tool detected what may be the largest fish school ever recorded in one image, the researchers report in the Feb.
Since it is a hallmark of most humans not to stick out from their crowd, a surprisingly large number of behaviors and thought processes in people are defined no differently than they are in the fish school.
These fish school during cooler weather and hunker down in the potholes and channels on low tides.
While biologists have never, to Couzin's knowledge, studied a fish school in the act of changing from one of the three swarming patterns to another, each of the patterns has been observed frequently in nature.