amphidromous

(redirected from Fish migration)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

amphidromous

descriptive of migratory behaviour of fish moving from fresh to salt water and vice versa for feeding or wintering purposes, but not for breeding. See ANADROMOUS, CATADROMOUS.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are other factors associated with the fish migration such as light intensity (Mackinson et al.
The Beaver Creek project began in 2003 to provide habitat anci enhance fish migration for Pacific Northwest salmon along with other resicient Puget Sound species.
There is also the issue of fish migration patterns that can't be disrupted.
Now the conditions have changes and measures should be taken now," Erdogan said and noted all necessary measures would be taken against criticisms that it would step up traffic and population, and that it would have a negative impact on fish migration, water resources and forests.
The research will be used in freshwater and marine environmental management to predict fish migration routes and assess the impact of human intervention.
The streams of the Apa and Miranda sub-basins in the Paraguay basin include sites with uneven relief, with countless waterfalls higher than 30 m, which act as barriers to fish migration within the basin (SUAREZ et al.
Beautifully illustrated, this volume explores the underwater landscape of the Irish and Celtic Seas, and documents fish migration, predator behavior, ocean currents and the effects of commercial fishing and other industries on marine ecology.
Studying biology and chemistry as an undergraduate at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, gave me the idea to approach ecological questions such as fish migration from a chemical perspective.
Environmentalists and commercial fishermen are concerned with marine entanglement, whale and fish migration and the effects of electromagnetic fields (which are generated by the wave energy buoys) on electro-sensitive species like sharks, rays and salmon.
Dams may impact fish migration and, consequently, the biological community as a whole.
Mr Knight added: "Any structure which impeded fish migration would have a catastrophic effect on the worldrenowned rivers Usk, Wye and Severn, and there is no way of recreating these fish populations elsewhere as compensation.