fork

(redirected from Fish fork)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Fish fork: salad fork, Dessert fork

fork

 [fork]
a pronged instrument.
tuning fork a device that produces harmonic vibration when its two prongs are struck; used to test hearing and bone conduction. See tuning fork tests.

fork

(fōrk),
1. A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.
2. An instrument resembling a fork in that it has tines or prongs.

fork

(fork) a pronged instrument.
replication fork  a site on a DNA molecule at which unwinding of the helices and synthesis of daughter molecules are both occurring.
Enlarge picture
Replication fork, showing simultaneous synthesis of both strands; since synthesis occurs in the 5′ to 3′ direction, one strand, the leading strand, can be synthesized continuously while the other, the lagging strand, must be synthesized discontinuously in short fragments (Okazaki fragments) which are later joined.
tuning fork  a device that produces harmonic vibration when its two prongs are struck; used to test hearing and bone conduction.

fork

[fôrk]
Etymology: L, furca
1 an instrument with prongs.
2 something resembling such an instrument.

fork

(fōrk)
A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.

fork

(fōrk)
1. A pronged instrument used for holding or lifting.
2. An instrument resembling a fork in that it has tines or prongs.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increase in fish weight correlated negatively with the increase in fish fork and total lengths while the correlation coefficient between increase in fish weight and feed intake was positively significant.
Increase in fish fork length had significantly direct relationship with an increase in total length while it remained negative but highly significant with feed intake by the fish.
Regressions of cranial structure measurement on fish fork length with the use of multiple structures was an effective tool for estimating size of fish consumed by Steller sea lions.
Both are also modern masters of what Bowen once called "Life with the Lid On," that kind of fiction in which terribly well-bred ladies and gentlemen, every whalebone and stud in place, suppress passion, terror, and doubt as they take up their fish forks and smile past their host.
The well-stocked Victorian cupboard held fish forks, asparagus servers, pickle forks, berry dishes and more.