fingerprint

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Related to Fingerprint analysis: Fingerprint identification

fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint

fingerprint

/fin·ger·print/ (-print)
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.

fingerprint

an image left on a smooth surface by the pattern of the pad of a distal phalanx. The distinctive pattern of loops and whorls represents the fine ridges marking the skin. Because each individual's fingerprints are unique, a classification system of the patterns is useful in identifying individuals.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.

dermatoglyphics

finger and toe prints; pattern of lines and whorls in pulp skin unique to the individual

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.

fingerprint

References in periodicals archive ?
The new email security techniques dive deeper into image spam messages and automate spam fingerprint analysis to further the effectiveness of image spam filtering that protects more than 40,000 Barracuda Networks customers worldwide.
A simple and sensitive H PLC method for the simultaneous determination of eight bioactive components and fingerprint analysis of Schisandra sphenanthera.
Then, the group repeated their fingerprint analysis, but now using only "top ten" or "bottom ten" models rather than the full 22 models.
Its initial products enable fingerprint analysis revealing highly-detailed information about the suspect.
POLICE stations across Worcestershire are piloting a revolutionary system marking the biggest change in fingerprint analysis for 100 years.
Courts and legal experts have begun questioning tool-mark analysis--say, the pry-bar markings on a doorframe; handwriting analysis; and even fingerprint analysis.
The results of the DNA fingerprint analysis are consistent with the conclusion that early detection of TB through the screening program leads to a reduction in transmission.
It is understood that DNA genetic fingerprint analysis from Kappen's family has all but proved that he was the murderer.
Because of the condition of the body, fingerprint analysis would have been impossible so dental records must be used to make an accurate identification, officials said.
In these cases, investigators conduct more extensive investigations using traditional techniques, such as fingerprint analysis, witness interviews, and handwriting analysis.
The 16-year-old, who cannot be named for legal reasons, pleaded guilty to the charge after he was caught by fingerprint analysis, costing pounds 650, a court at Gloucester heard.
They did a fingerprint analysis,'' said Deputy Debra Glafkides.