finger stick

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finger stick

or

fingerstick

(fĭng′gər-stĭk′)
n.
The drawing of blood from the fingertip, usually with a thin blade and a micropipette, for diagnostic testing.

finger stick

the act of puncturing the tip of the finger to obtain a small sample of capillary blood. In some procedures the hand may be first immersed in warm water for 10 minutes to "arterialize" the capillary blood or give it characteristics similar to those of arterial blood.

Finger stick

A technique for collecting a very small amount of blood from the fingertip area.
Mentioned in: Phlebotomy
References in periodicals archive ?
A growing number of clinically important tests are performed using fingerprick blood, and this is especially true in low-resource settings, said one of the researchers, Meaghan Bond from Rice University in Houston, US.
Regarding HBGM (Table 5), 14 subjects did fingerpricks themselves.
A drop (20 [micro]L-50 [micro]L) of fingerprick blood was placed directly on premarked filter paper.
The new test, called PSAWatch, needs only a small drop of blood from a fingerprick which is then analysed using a portable machine.
2001), fingerprick blood spots (Worthman and Stallings 1997), home semen collection (Royster et al.
ATLANTA, July 27, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Research presented at the 2015 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo will expand on the studies that led to a fingerprick Ebola test becoming the first and only rapid diagnostic for this disease to receive approval from the World Health Organization (WHO).
One fingerprick blood sample was obtained from each respondent for the preparation of a P.
The rapid POC test did not cause any discomfort to 41 (68%) persons, but others found the fingerprick more painful and frightening than venipuncture.
In the future, it may be possible to reduce this amount of blood even further, which would open the possibility for blood collection from a simple fingerprick, avoiding the need for phlebotomy and its risk of complications.
Also, our medical staff appreciates how easy the LDX is to use, and parents appreciate that the fingerprick is so child- friendly, especially as compared to a blood draw.