amoeboid

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amoeboid

(ə-mē′boid′)
adj.
Of or resembling an amoeba, especially in changeability of form and means of locomotion.

a·me·boid

(ă-mē'boyd)
1. Resembling an ameba in appearance or characteristics.
2. Of irregular outline with peripheral projections; denoting the outline of a form of colony in plate culture.
Synonym(s): amoeboid.
[ameba + G. eidos, appearance]

amoeboid

Resembling an amoeba, especially in its method of locomotion. An amoeba is a shapeless, jelly-like, single-celled organism that moves by pushing out a protrusion, a pseudopodium, in the required direction and then flowing into it.

amoeboid

moving and feeding in the manner of Amoeba, by the action of PSEUDOPODIA.
References in periodicals archive ?
See Gwen Filosa, Inmates Ordered Freed at Prison, NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE, May 25, 2006, at 1.
See Gwen Filosa, Indigent Board to Have Day in Court; Defenders Ordered to Appear, NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE, Sept.
21) For more on Decameron 4 and 8, see Getto, "Le novelle dello scambio"; Radcliff-Umstead; Rozsa; Filosa, "Modalita di contatto.
Gwen Filosa, Rave Promoters Feel the Heat, NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE, Mar.
Jim and Mark want me to be a success and they show it with everything they do," commented Filosa.
Filosa, a Milford resident who owns a house on Cape Cod where he keeps his medals and other military items, was a seaman first class on the USS Pennsylvania at Pearl Harbor on Dec.
Filosa said military personnel at Pearl Harbor knew war was inevitable, but there was no inkling of what was about to happen 10 minutes after he reached the crow's nest at about 7:45 a.
Filosa wasn't sure it was the Japanese, but then he remembered being told in training exercises that Japanese pilots flew with white scarves around their necks.
Filosa, however, believes one of the reasons the losses were not greater is that the ship was out of the water in drydock which meant it couldn't be hit by the Japanese torpedoes that sunk other ships.
Filosa, who was never wounded, was transferred to the USS Massachusetts in 1942, another battleship that he saw action on in both the Atlantic and Pacific theaters during the rest of the war.
Filosa worked in the USS Masssachusetts ship's store where he would sleep in a space about the size of a large office desk.
Elsa Filosa, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill