censorship

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censorship

 [sen´ser-ship]
the action of the censor.

censorship

(sĕn′sər-shĭp′)
n.
Psychology Prevention of disturbing or painful thoughts or feelings from reaching consciousness except in a disguised form.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Miracle Case: Film Censorship and the Supreme Court
The error by Margaret Thatcher's government was seized upon by the Liberal Democrats, who said it had left film censorship in chaos.
2) Procensorship lobby groups then used the film censorship as a steppingstone in their war against 'evil' literature.
In 1915, Kansas was one of a handful of states that established its own film censorship board.
India has a National Film Development Corporation to support production; the government also has a bureaucracy of film censorship (which, as in other countries, has seen changing cultural values and hence film guidelines).
This means it is possible for film censorship to change with the times.
Doubts were also raised about whether the movie could weather the scrutiny of the Film Censorship Agency as there are many sensitive scenes in the movie.
Although they often struggled for Le Bureau approval of titillating films like Samoa, Queen of the Jungle and The Screentest Girls, Link and Dunning both credit Guerin for gradually ending film censorship in the province, and in turn, the entire country.
To date, COLLATE's digital library comprises about 18000 digitized document pages, providing detailed documentary evidence of film censorship procedures in these three countries within the initially defined time period.
The Film Censorship Act of 1923 prohibited me from seeing Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma.
There are essays on the treatment of the Second World War and the Cold War, specific producers, writers and directors, film censorship, and three 'personal views' by Bryony Dixon, Isabel Quigley and Colin Redgrave, three people involved personally in the films of the 1950s.
In view of present day arguments about film censorship it is interesting to recall that in nineteenth century Sydney plays written by local authors had to be submitted for approval to the Colonial Secretary's Office before they could be presented on the stage.