filament

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filament

 [fil´ah-ment]
1. a delicate fiber or thread.
2. in an x-ray tube, the wire (cathode) that makes electrons available for interaction with the anode when it is heated to incandescence to form an electron cloud.
actin filament one of the thin contractile filaments in a myofibril, composed mainly of actin; each actin filament is surrounded by three myosin filaments.
myosin filament one of the thick contractile filaments in a myofibril, composed mainly of myosin; each myosin filament is surrounded by six actin filaments.

fil·a·ment

(fil'ă-ment),
1. Synonym(s): filamentum
2. In bacteriology, a fine threadlike form, unsegmented or segmented without constrictions.
[L. filamentum, fr. filum, a thread]

filament

/fil·a·ment/ (fil´ah-ment) a delicate fiber or thread.
actin filament  one of the thin contractile myofilaments in a myofibril.
intermediate filaments  a class of cytoplasmic filaments that predominantly act as structural components of the cytoskeleton and also effect various movements in cellular processes.
muscle filament  myofilament.
myosin filament  one of the thick contractile myofilaments in a myofibril.
thick filaments  bipolar myosin filaments occurring in striated muscle.
thin filaments  actin filaments occurring, associated with troponin and tropomyosin, in striated muscle.

filament

(fĭl′ə-mənt)
n.
1. A fine or very thin thread or fiber: filaments of cloth; filaments of flax.
2. A slender or threadlike structure or part, especially:
a. A fine wire that is heated electrically to produce light in an incandescent lamp.
b. The stalk that bears the anther in the stamen of a flower.
c. A chainlike series of cells, as in many algae.
d. A long thin cellular structure characteristic of many fungi, usually having multiple nuclei and often divided by septa.
e. Any of various long thin celestial objects or phenomena, such as a solar filament.

fil′a·men′tous (-mĕn′təs), fil′a·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -mĕn′trē) adj.

filament

[fil′əmənt]
Etymology: L, filare, to spin
a fine threadlike fiber. Filaments are found in most tissues and cells of the body and serve various morphological or physiological functions.

fil·a·ment

(fil'ă-mĕnt)
1. Synonym(s): filamentum.
2. bacteriology A fine threadlike form, unsegmented or segmented without constrictions.
3. A tungsten wire located within the cathode of a diagnostic x-ray tube. After being heated it produces electrons.
[L. filamentum, fr. filum, a thread]

filament

  1. the stalk of a STAMEN bearing the ANTHER at its apex.
  2. a type of cellular organization consisting of a threadlike row of cells, as found in certain algae, for example, Spirogyra.

fil·a·ment

(fil'ă-mĕnt)
1. Synonym(s): filamentum.
2. bacteriology a fine threadlike form, unsegmented or segmented without constrictions.
[L. filamentum, fr. filum, a thread]

filament,

n an individual manufactured toothbrush bristle.
filament, curved,
n a single toothbrush bristle, manufactured to bend with the curve of the dental surface, designed to assist contact with the gingival line when used at a 45° angle.
filament, end rounded,
n refers to the manufactured shaping of an individual toothbrush bristle with an exceptionally rounded tip designed to protect teeth and gums during brushing.

filament

a delicate fiber or thread.

beard filament
structures of the beard of the male turkey are neither hairs nor feathers but have some of the characteristics of both.
filament control
in an x-ray machine this controls the filament current in the x-ray tube. The size of the current and its duration are controlled in this way.
filament current
in an x-ray machine the strength of the current to the filament is varied by the use of a filament or stepdown transformer.
filament focal spot size
the focal spot of the x-ray beam should be as small as possible to give maximum sharpness and clarity. Its size is determined by the size of the filament opposite that generates the beam, the anode angle and other factors.
intermediate filament
non-contractile elements in the supportive structure of cytoplasm.
References in periodicals archive ?
They also have a great dimming capability, even when used with older dimmers, and their filaments are longer than comparable bulbs.
The idea for this store was born out of frustration and the inability to find good quality, non-toxic filaments for 3D printing projects at home with my kids," says Rachel Spieczny, President and Founder of Clean Strands.
Caption: The cosmic web, shown in a computer simulation, consists of filaments of dark matter and gas.
In other words, stars forming within filaments tend to be more massive than stars forming in the field.
Cellulose filaments are made from wood fiber, one of nature's most abundant materials, and are used to add strength, stability, flexibility and longevity to a variety of materials, including cement, composites and coatings.
Several small filaments were observed in the northern hemisphere on Mar 14 along with plage around AR1054.
Moreover, the mechanical, elastic recovery, and dyeing properties of the PETT copolymer filaments fabricated by melt spinning were investigated and compared with the corresponding properties of pure PET, PTT, and PBT filaments.
The filament moves by anodic attack of the metal surface.
Thickening of the actin filaments at the cell edge provided the bending force to extrude the virus particles.
of Wuxi, China, have formed a joint venture for the production and distribution of filaments used in toothbrushes, paint brushes and cosmetic and industrial brush applications.
The new venture will be responsible for producing acetate filaments at Teijin's plant in Matsuyama, western Japan, and for supplying the products to the parent companies' existing clients.