dry pleurisy

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dry pleur·i·sy

pleurisy with a fibrinous exudation, without an effusion of serum, resulting in adhesion between the opposing surfaces of the pleura.

dry pleurisy

Etymology: AS, dryge, dry; Gk, pleuritis
inflammation of the pleura without effusion of serum. The cause may be a localized injury. Dry pleurisy may also be an early sign of tuberculosis.

dry pleurisy

A complication of acute bacterial pneumonia, tuberculosis or rheumatic fever, caused by multiple serofibrinous adhesions on the visceral pleura, which may, if intense, cause fibrothorax.

Clinical findings
Pain and guarding on inspiration; patients often lie on the affected side to “splint”.

dry pleu·ri·sy

(drī plūr'i-sē)
Pleurisy with a fibrinous exudation, without an effusion of serum, resulting in adhesion between the opposing surfaces of the pleura.
Synonym(s): adhesive pleurisy, fibrinous pleurisy, plastic pleurisy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reactive mesothelial hyperplasia is often, but not always, seen in association with organizing fibrinous and/or fibrous pleuritis (Figure 2).
The proliferating fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and spindled mesothelial cells of organizing pleuritis may mimic sarcomatoid DMM, and fibrocytes and spindled mesothelial cells within mature, dense, fibrous pleuritis may mimic desmoplastic DMM.
Environmental exposure to asbestos and asbestiform fibers is not only a major cause of malignant mesothelioma (MM) of the serous membranes, but also leads to a variety of other benign changes in the lung such as fibrous pleuritis, pleural hyaline plaques, and diffuse intersititial fibrosis as well.
Some recently diagnosed malignant mesothelioma cases in Cukurova University as well as a case of fibrous pleuritis with hyaline plaque were also included in the study.
Immunohistochemistry is of little value in the differential diagnosis between chronic fibrous pleuritis and malignant mesothelioma, except for keratin stains helping to identify the presence of invasive growth (Figure 10, C).
The distinction between desmoplastic malignant mesothelioma and chronic fibrous pleuritis is one of the most difficult problems faced by experts in mesothelioma diagnosis.