prenatal diagnosis

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pre·na·tal di·ag·no·sis

diagnosis using procedures available for the recognition of diseases and malformations in utero, and the conclusion reached.
Synonym(s): antenatal diagnosis

prenatal diagnosis

any of various diagnostic techniques to determine whether a developing fetus is affected with a genetic disorder or other abnormality. Such procedures as radiographic examination and ultrasound scanning can be used to follow fetal growth and detect structural abnormalities; amniocentesis enables fetal cells to be obtained from the amniotic fluid for culture and biochemical assay for detection of metabolic disorders and chromosomal analysis; fetoscopy enables fetal blood to be withdrawn from a blood vessel of the placenta and examined for disorders such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. If any of the test results are positive and the child is likely to be born with a severe defect or disease, the parents need support and advice from genetic counselors on whether to terminate the pregnancy. If the parents decide to have the baby, the nurse can help educate them about the specific disorder and prepare them for the special care required of a handicapped or genetically defective child. Also called antenatal diagnosis. See also chorionic villus sampling, genetic counseling, genetic screening.

prenatal diagnosis

Obstetrics The examination of fetal cells taken from the amniotic fluid, the primitive placenta–chorion, or umbilical cord for biochemical, chromosomal, or gene defects

pre·na·tal di·ag·no·sis

(prē-nā'tăl dī'ăg-nō'sis)
Diagnosis using procedures available for the recognition of diseases and malformations in utero, and the conclusion reached.

Prenatal diagnosis

The determination of whether a fetus possesses a disease or disorder while it is still in the womb.
References in periodicals archive ?
4, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) brought together a unique community of families from across the Midwest: all former CHOP patients who traveled to Pennsylvania and either underwent fetal surgery to treat conditions before birth, or needed specialized care or surgery immediately after birth.
Scott Adzick, surgeon in chief and director of the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at CHOP Currently, MMC repairs are done at 20 weeks--25 weeks 6 days gestation.
The conference includes lectures and panel discussions featuring leaders in cardiac care, fetal diagnosis and treatment, maternal fetal medicine, oncology, neonatology and transplantation.
th] annual Family Reunion hosted by the Hospital's Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment.
He has garnered international recognition for his work in pre- and post-natal minimal access surgery and fetal diagnosis.
Adzick, who capably leads the center for fetal diagnosis and therapy at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and serves as the C.
In addition, such procedures require immense resources and expertise in fetal diagnosis, obstetric and cardiovascular imaging, catheter techniques and maternal care.
Adzick, director of the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at Children's Hospital.
Hedrick, also a well-known pediatric surgeon, specifically for her work within CHOP's Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment and for her own experience separating conjoined twins, was trained by Dr.
Crombleholme of the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- The Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) brought together a unique community of families from across the Midwest: all former CHOP patients who traveled to Pennsylvania and either underwent fetal surgery to treat conditions before birth, or needed specialized care or surgery immediately after birth.
Specialists from the Center for Fetal Diagnosis and Treatment at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) published their findings online August 15 in Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy.