Fermi


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Fer·mi

(fār'mē),
Enrico, Italian-born U.S. physicist and Nobel laureate, 1901-1954. See: fermium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contrary to the discoverers' hopes, the Fermi bubbles failed to sway all naysayers of the microwave haze.
Located in Newport, Michigan, the Fermi 2 plant is a General Electric Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) power plant that produces 1.
The "all-sky map" represents all of the gamma-ray detections above 10 gigaelectronvolts that the Fermi telescope has seen in three years' worth of data.
Fermi team member Rolf Buehler (DESY Zeuthen, Germany) and his colleagues think this wind could be the flare culprit.
The Fermi results concern two particular supernova remnants, known as IC 443 and W44, which scientists studied to prove supernova remnants produce cosmic rays.
Held in July of 2005 at Italy's International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi," a special course was organized to bring together researchers from physics, mathematics, and computer science to give lectures on quantum information processing and communication.
There is even controversy over the applicable characteristic length scale: whether it is the so-called Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) coherence length, or a much smaller length that is inversely proportional to the Fermi energy of the system.
Fermi Provides Important Data on Gamma Rays to Scientific Researchers --
However, so far, searches carried out using NASA's powerful Fermi gamma-ray space telescope have failed to reveal any convincing signals.
We have waited a long time for a gamma-ray burst this shockingly, eye-wateringly bright," Julie McEnery, project scientist for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md said.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- An international team of scientists using NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has discovered a surprisingly powerful millisecond pulsar that challenges existing theories about how these objects form.
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is watching some of the most extreme phenomena in the distant universe, but little did the Fermi team expect it to be hit from below.